Deadline Day is Coming! London Independent Story Prize

Just a few days left until the Deadline! 10th of January!

Polish those 300-word short-short stories and take your chance. Become a part of this wonderful community of writers and storytellers. Take the chance of winning the prize! Give your story a chance to be recognised.

Check out the 2018 Calendar from here LISP.

LISP judges are looking for strong and unique voices, check out the interviews with the judges on the website.

‘Originality must come from other resources: from one’s own voice, personality, character.’ Luis Pizarro, LISP judge.

‘Given that the story can only be 300 words, I am looking for something beyond the ephemeral, a story that will make an impression.’ James Kirchick, LISP judge.

‘LISP is based on creating a great community and, of course, all the writers who attend the competition will definitely be a part of this network. However, winners are winners, and they will have the greatest advantage. First of all, the prize and publication, and when you win a competition, it means that your pen has been recognised, which is a great feature for any writer. Not only while trying to reach agents or publishers, but also the personal satisfaction is priceless. Especially for young writers, it’s a way to build confidence.

As an award winner, I can also say that it helps you to improve. Now you see that you can write things that others appreciate as well, which encourages you to be even bolder.’ Ozge Gozturk, LISP founder.

New Release – HCE: The Brutal Issue!

The brand new issue of Here Comes Everyone magazine – The Brutal Issue – is now published and available for you to buy!

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Inside The Brutal Issue, you will find the work of sixty writers and artists from all around the world. As well as short stories/flash fiction, we publish poetry, creative non-fiction and artwork.

New features include: more pages than ever before, better quality paper and a perfect-bound spine, so the A5 magazine will feel at home on your bookshelves. It’s a bargain at only £5 (plus p&p).

Our next issue will be The Tomorrow Issue. Submissions don’t open until 1st February, but the new theme will be space/science/technology. So start thinking…

Bunbury is back with Fallout.

So here we are again with Bunbury Magazine, dear Bunburyists. Issue seventeen. It feels like seventeen should the unlucky number, not thirteen. Thirteen gets a bad rap, probably because it got caught in the fallout of those Friday the Thirteenth films.

Oh, fallout! That’s why we’re here. It’s not often we get that distracted that early on. This is our fallout themed issue. We thought it timely going with this theme given everything going on in the world right now. As you know, we here at Bunbury towers try to stay non-partisan in all things outside of creativity but there are some things – some big things lurking around the world – that just cannot be ignored.

Our suggestion? Hunker down with plenty of water, canned food and ride out the fallout with this new issue. As usual, it’s packed to the reinforced-steel rafters with poetry, short stories, art and all of the nice things to help you escape from the outside world (REMAIN INDOORS). We also have a superb feature and interview with the very talented Aaron Kent, curator of Poetic Interviews, one of the most exciting projects happening in the poetry at the moment.

You can get this brand new issue but clicking the gorgeous front cover below (very expertly created by Amy Telfer). It is on pay-what-you-like but we suggest £3 for something so lovingly put together. Alternatively, if you pay £15 for this or any other issue, we will send you a copy of the Bunbury Creative Anthology Vol. 1, which contains the best bits from the first 12 issues. Come on, that’s a bargain!

Speaking of exciting, there are exciting times afoot here at Bunbury. Last issue, we introduced Dean Rhetoric to you, our new poetry editor, who has also put together amazing features for us and you (The Best Kept Secrets in Poetry last time)!

Well our team has expanded evermore. We would now like you all to welcome Malika M Street, who has joined us as poetry editor (and also helps us run our spoken word sister event Just Write). We also have Fiona Nuttall, who will be editing the short story section from here on in. We are so thrilled to have these three beautiful humans on board. We have no doubt that each section will be full to the brim with the highest quality you can find!

In other OTHER news, our doors are once again open for submissions. The theme is THE HUNT for issue 18. You can find our submissions guidelines and more how to get in touch on our website (just click the thing below!)

With all that, enough of the dillying and dallying. We must away to put on our tin hats and crouch under a rickety, match-stick table. Keep calm and Bunbury.

Much love and keep scribbling!

Christopher and Keri.

Submissions open for Shooter’s “New Life” issue

Submissions have reopened for Shooter Literary Magazine‘s issue #7 with the theme of “New Life”.

As always, the theme is open to interpretation. In addition to the subject of birth, writers might like to consider themes to do with renewal, invention and reinvention. “New Life” could conjure starting over later in life; giving someone a chance at a critical time; rescuing animals or people, perhaps through adoption; second chances and opportunities that radically change someone’s circumstances. Non-fiction to do with trying to get pregnant, birth or parenting (from either a personal or political perspective) is particularly welcome. Poetry should incline to the observational rather than experimental end of the spectrum.

Literary fiction, creative non-fiction and narrative journalism should fall between 2,000 and 7,500 words. Please submit only one story or up to three poems per issue. Simultaneous submissions are welcome but let us know if your work is accepted elsewhere. All work must be previously unpublished either in print or online. Successful writers receive payment and a copy of the issue.

Please read the guidelines at Shooter’s Submissions page before sending your work. The deadline for issue #7, which comes out this winter, is November 5th.

In addition to general submissions to the magazine, poets might like to submit verse on any theme to Shooter’s 2017 Poetry Competition. Further details can be found at https://shooterlitmag.com/poetry-competition.

How can you #resist a new Bunbury? Issue 16 is here!

WELCOME

Roll up! Roll up!

Welcome one and all, to this, the 16th issue of Bunbury Magazine.

The theme of this issue was #resist and, unlike Trump around the ladies, we just couldn’t. We wanted to shake it up a little this time as we usually don’t dabble in the greasy world of politics and the wonderful people who submitted did not disappoint.
We hope you enjoy reading this as much as we enjoyed editing and yes, I know we say it every time but every time it is a genuine pleasure and honour to be taken on such fabulous journeys.

You can get your virtual hands on this new piece of loveliness by clicking on the gorgeous front cover below (artwork provided by Marina Iks/Semina Arts). We run the magazine on a Pay-What-You-Feel basis. We recommend £3 which we can put back into the magazine and other projects we have in the pipeline. It also goes to thank those people that help us put it all together. Click now, follks!

 

INTRODUCING

We’re growing and changing at Bunbury. We are very proud to welcome into the fold a long term friend, respected writer and editor and now, colleague, Dean Rhetoric!
He will be on the editing team for poetry and will be out and about spreading the good word of Bunbury throughout, well wherever he goes really. He has also put together a phenomenal feature for this issue entitled The Best Kept Secrets in Poetry. His finger is on the pulse of what is up-and-coming in the poetry world and this is well worth a read.

SUBMISSIONS

Our inbox is now open for submissions. The theme is for issue 17 is Fallout. As always, we are looking for short stories, poetry, flash fiction, art, photography and basically any form of creativity.

Please send your submissions to submissions@bunburymagazine.com.

You can find all of our guidelines at https://bunburymagazine.com/submit-to-us/.

INTREGUE

As we’ve already said, we’re growing and changing so over the next few months, look out for exciting announcements, opportunities and other fun stuff.
But where will you be announcing these amazingly awesome things?! We hear you cry! Well you can follow us on Facebook and Twitter by clicking the buttons below.

 

SUPPORT

We now have a Patreon too. As we have said, everything we do for the magazine, our events and the support we give to grass-roots creativity comes out of our own pockets. In order to make this support even better, we are looking for YOUR support. We are on the verge of getting the magazine into print and we want to launch more anthologies and a podcast. None of this can be done for free. With your donations, we can expand our network and put more resources into Bunbury Magazine. You can get to our Patreon page by clicking our logo below. There are fabulous incentives and the chance to get involved in the magazine.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this,
We’ll leave you to it. Much love,

Christopher and Keri.

OKTHANKSLOVEYOUBYE!!!

Issue #2 of The Ham

We are very pleased to announce the official release of issue #2 of The Ham. The theme of this second issue is ‘Change & Stasis’.

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We have listed around a third of the total amount of printed copies for sale on our website for the small cost of £3 for a physical or £2.50 for a digital copy. We’re hoping that we might be able to make enough from selling a small number of copies online to fund the printing of future issues, and no longer have to look for outside funding to pay for the printing and distribution of The Ham.

The other two-thirds of the second issue will be distributed for free, throughout the UK, in bars, cafes, museums, galleries and public transport. For those of you unlucky enough to pick up a free copy, or for those of you feeling generous enough to buy one, you can purchase a physical or a digital copy here, as well as get a free digital copy of issue #1 if you happened to have missed it. Issue #2 is just as hefty as issue #1, with 88 pages packed full of quality short-fiction, poetry, artwork and photography, for about the price of a fancy cup of coffee. We hope you enjoy it!!

In other news, we are hoping to publish a lot more work on our website in the interim periods between the release of the physical issues of The Ham. So send us your short-fiction, poetry, artwork and photography to thehamfreepress@gmail.com and if we like it we will try our best to publish it. If we really like it, we will also try and publish it in the next physical issue of The Ham. We’re not looking for any specific themes, just quality, unique pieces of work.

Finally, we now have a mailing list! Once signed up you will receive emails every couple of weeks with new work from our contributors, and you will be the first to know when we put out the call for submissions for our print edition. To sign up just click here!

Ed (Editor)

Call for Submissions: HCE’s Brutal Issue

The editors at Here Come Everyone magazine (HCE) are seeking submissions for our upcoming Brutal Issue. We’re a quarterly literary magazine of short fiction, poetry, articles and artwork based around topical and interesting themes. HCE is published by Silhouette Press, a not-for-profit publishing social enterprise that aims to create a network of artists, writers and thinkers to create new and innovative content, as well as carry out community creative writing projects. Together, we aim to provide an open and accessible platform for readers and contributors.

The new theme: BRUTALITY/BRUTALISM

Deadline: 30 June 2017

We encourage bold/striking interpretations of the theme. If your link to brutality isn’t self-evident, we advise you to include a few lines in your author bio to provide context.

Poetry: you may submit up to three poems of no longer than 30 lines each.

Fiction: please submit only one piece per issue; stories may be up to 2,000 words.

Non-fiction: please submit only one piece per issue; articles may be up to 1,500 words.

Artwork: you may submit up to three pieces; we accept all visual media (300 dpi and 640 x 640 res)

 

Please see our submissions guidelines for full details. Work must be sent via the Submittable button on our website; stuff we receive via email will not be accepted. Any Word or .doc.x format is fine, but no PDFs. For submissions of artwork, please ensure your files are of sufficient image size and hi-res, otherwise they cannot be used.

We look forward to receiving your creations…

To get an idea of what HCE is looking for, you can check out our brand new Toys & Games Issue – now available for purchase from our shop! Full of short stories and flash fiction, plus art, poetry and other writing.

Fictive Dream is one year old!

Fictive Dream is a year old and to mark this we’ll be publishing eight stories from our best-loved writers.

Steve Carr (USA) and Anne Goodwin (UK) will kick off the series on 7 May 2017. Following on throughout May will be Sandra Arnold (New Zealand), Paul Beckman (USA), Tamar Hodes and James Wall both from Britain, Annie Dawid (USA) and rounding off, Isobel Blackthorn (Australia).

Fictive Dream is open to submissions throughout the year.

Check out our submission guidelines here and send us your best. 

Happy reading.

Laura Black
Editor

www.fictivedream.com
@FictiveDream

Issue 7 available + call for submissions

Issue 7 of The Nottingham Review is now available to read online here.

Featuring original short fiction by Chloe Turner, Fiona J. Mackintosh, Anton Rose, Charles Haddox, Shannon McLeod, Rachel Wild, Kimberly Paulk, Jenny Bhatt, Neil Bristow, Mike Fox, Sonia Hope, and Bryn Agnew. Poetry by Adam Tavel, Ariel Clark-Semyck, Matthew Lippman, Sarah Escue, Jacq Greyja, and Benjamin Hertwig.

Call for submissions

We are open for submissions until the end of May. In our first themed issue we are exploring COURAGE. Controlling fear in dangerous or difficult situations. Having the confidence to be yourself. Doing or saying what you think is right despite opposition. Facing suffering with dignity or faith. Courage can be physical or moral, and come in many sizes and shapes. Fiction between 100-3000 words and poetry.

Submission guidelines can be found here.

Bunbury is back with Issue 15 and some exciting news!

Well, hello from all of us at Bunbury Magazine to you, Dear Bunburyists,

We’re not quite sure on the etiquette for how late we can wish you all a Happy New Year. We think after about 15th January it becomes a little awkward but, you know what? This is the first issue of 2017 so you’re getting it…

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

We hope your 2017 has gotten off to a rollicking start. Ours has been a nice peaceful affair here so far. That’s what we’re going with anyway. In reality, we have been running around like blue-proverbialled flies getting this next nugget of loveliness together for you! We make it sound like a chore, don’t we? It really is not!

Once again, we have been blessed with some of the finest writing from around the world. It has been an honour to read all the words sent in to us. Not only that, but we have some wonderful art to bring to you (the front cover is more than a little spiffy, we’re sure you’ll agree!)

Without further ado, you can download this new issue for the (not so) new year by clicking on the gorgeous link picture below, kindly given to us by Vincent Davis.

As always, we recommend a £3 donation, which is really good value for all the joy we are bringing to your Kindles/Laptops/Eyes. However, if you would like to donate £15 to our support network for grass-roots creativity, we will send you a copy of The Bunbury Creative Anthology. Simply email us on bunburymagazine@gmail.com with your details when you have paid and we will put it in the post for you.

As well as all this, last year we had the pleasure of putting together two incredible features for you. As usual, we took our annual trip up to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. As usual, we spent five days legging it from one venue to the next, making sure we caught up with the very best shows at the Fringe and boy, did we see some utter crackers! This issue’s feature brings you the very best of The Fringe 2016.

As well as this, we are thrilled to bring you a feature on Evidently, one of Manchester’s premier spoken word nights. Honestly, if you love performance poetry, get down to this bad boy. We don’t care that you don’t live in the area. Travel! We interviewed the headliners and open mic guests to give you a flavour of what Kieren King and Ella Gainsborough, the eminent creators of Evidently, organise.

  Last but not least, the exciting news! We’ve been short-listed for Best Magazine in this year’s Saboteur Awards. Thank you so much to all those who voted for us to get to the short-list. Last year, we came third. This year, we want to win. We want to win for all the writers, artists, comedians, performers and all round magnificent people we have featured in all 15 issues. To vote for us, click on the picture below. (While you’re there, please vote for Evidently, stars of this issue, for Best Regular Spoken Word Show!) We’d really appreciate it.

            Anyway, happy new year again. Yeah, yeah, we know it’s too late for all that. Just go and read the magazine, will you?

Much love and keep scribbling,

Christopher and Keri.

Number Eleven Issue Nine

It may have taken me a while but Number Eleven is back!! Issue Nine of Number Eleven is live, ready and waiting for you. Featuring the work of 10 authors from around the world, I invite you to pull up your favourite chair, turn on your reading light and slip into the wonderful worlds created for you by our carefully selected authors.

As a little aside, we are currently preparing Issue Ten and we would love to read YOUR work!! If you have a piece of short or flash fiction burning a hole in your digital pocket then please do send it our way, we’d love to step into your world and get lost, quite possibly! You can submit to numbereleveneditor@gmail.com, we look forward to hearing from you!

Until next time, close your eyes and hope for the best!

Graham

After a Long Break *drum roll* Bunbury is Back!

Hello dear Bunburyists!

We have had quite the busy time of it here at Bunbury Magazine HQ! Firstly, we would like to introduce you to our new addition, Siân S. Rathore who has climbed aboard and will be taking care the poetry. Taking it for walks, feeding it, making sure it gets enough affection. Most importantly, Siân will be editing it. This makes us happy. We’re thrilled to have her on board as her achievements and skill-set are amazing. We look forward to working with her on other projects in the future too!

At the beginning of August, Co-directors Christopher and Keri only went and blinking got married, becoming Mr & Mrs Moriarty! In true form, they had a poetry slam, the winner of which was Fiona Nuttall who won a canvas painted by Keri. They cut the cake with a chainsaw so, pretty standard stuff really.

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After that, we went to Edinburgh for the Fringe festival as we do every year. We had a great time and, as usual, we handed out our interview packs, made new friends and met up with old ones too. There are lots of pictures and reviews on our website, bunburymagazine.com to look at from our trip. The Edinburgh Fringe special feature will be out later on in the year so we’ll keep you up to date with that.

Anyhoo, back to this issue. The theme was Atmosphere and we have loads of wonderful things for you to gaze upon and get cosy with including an interview with the wonderful and always lovely David Hartley, some fabulous art and photography and the usual selection of top class fiction and poetry and much, much more.

To get your hands on the latest lovely package of joy, click on the gorgeous front cover below (it was done by the amazingly talented Rachael Broadhurst. As always, it is available for Pay-What-You-Like (though we do recommend £3 for all the hard work our team puts into it.)

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We really hope you enjoy this issue as much (if not more!) as previous ones. We always are taken aback by the quality of pieces submitted to us. We say it every time, if it wasn’t for your submissions and kind words, we wouldn’t be here.

We will be back in December with our Terra-themed issue. This will also include the fruits of our trip to Edinburgh, with loads of interviews from some of the stars of the Free Fringe. In the meantime, please do check in with us on social media. We have them all and everything!

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Thank you all so very much, sit back, relax and bathe your eyes in Bunbury!

Much love,
Christopher & Keri Moriarty

ISSUE 10 – OUT NOW!

We are thrilled to announce the tenth issue of Short Fiction.

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There are 13 beautifully illustrated stories from around the world, 180 pages including Nick Holdstock, Kit de Waal, Colin Barrett, Ríona Judge McCormack, Inderjeet Mani, plus our competition winner, Michelle Coyne. And a 16-page centrepiece artwork by Lisa Stokes. We are so grateful for all your support over the years, and hope we have produced another fine issue for you.

You can order your copy for just £8 here.

Warm wishes

The Editors

The A3 Review: Issue 5 Is Here!

issue-5It’s a busy time at the The A3 Review. Issue #5 has officially launched! Short fiction and poetry from the UK, North America and Ireland. There’s also a guest piece from leading US flash fiction writer Meg Pokrass. You can order a copy via this link.

Meanwhile, our monthly contests to find contributors for Issue #6 are underway. The theme for October is Uniforms. Soldiers, nurses, prisoners, cops, sailors, fighter pilots, guerilla fighters, firefighters, goths, priests, chefs, hipsters and school children… the list of uniforms people wear is long and varied.

We’re looking for stories about how characters change when they put on a uniform, how people perceive those in uniform, how much of a disguise a uniform can be. You could write about a couple – one who loves their uniform, the other hates it. Or someone who doesn’t need to wear a uniform, but does anyway. Use the idea of rank and status to kickstart your creativity. Write about uniforms you’ve worn, or about those that excite or scare you. Secret uniforms and uniforms that elicit shame or pride.

Visit our Submittable page for more inspiration. The deadline is 22 October 2016.

Each month we choose two winning pieces for publication (The A3 Review is published twice a year). All winning entries receive Writing Maps and contributor copies, while three overall winners for each issue receive cash prizes totaling £275. You can get more inspiration by following The A3 Review on Twitter @TheA3Review and sign up for our newsletter here.

If you’re looking for detailed, knowledgeable and forward-looking feedback on your short fiction, editors KM Elkes and Shaun Levin are offering a critique service for writers. To find out more click here.

Happy writing and reading.

One Issue and Six Deadlines

The new issue of The A3 Review will be published on October 1. You can pre-order a copy via this link.

Each month we choose two winning pieces, then we publish them in an issue twice a year. We’re already on the look-out for new work to feature in Issue #6, and our first monthly contest ends on September 24th. Even if you missed it, there are five more till February.

The theme this month is ISLANDS. We want your best short fiction (as well as poetry or artwork) about desert islands or private islands, unexplored islands, prison islands, treasure islands, remote islands or the island you live on. Write about the islands you’ve never been to. Think about the geography of an island – does it have palm-fringed beaches or sheer cliffs? Is it covered in forest or volcanic wasteland? Who are the people and creatures that live on the island – are they hostile or friendly? Strange or familiar?

Think about other types of islands – islands of plastic in the middle of the ocean, log islands moving down river, misty islands in the middle of lakes. Tell the story (in no more than 150 words) about a surreal island where time and reality is subtly changed. Find inspiration in the symbolism of islands – their separation, their independence, their aloneness. Explore the word itself, the phrases hidden in it, its sound. Eye land. Aye! Land!

We welcome short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 panel. The deadline is 24th September 2016.

Editor KM Elkes will choose two winners for publication in Issue #6. All winning entries will receive Writing Maps and contributor copies, while three overall winners receive cash prizes.

You can get more inspiration by following The A3 Review on Twitter @TheA3Review and sign up for our newsletter here.

Editors KM Elkes and Shaun Levin also offer a critique service for writers looking for detailed, knowledgeable and forward-looking feedback on their work. To find out more about The A3 Review‘s Critique Service, click here.

The Lonely Crowd

It’s been a busy month at The Lonely Crowd with the announcement of Issue Five, our largest anthology to date, alongside the news that our publishing wing will release its first full length books in spring, 2017: The Beautiful Rooms by Valerie Sirr and Ergasy by Chris Cornwell.

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Valerie Sirr

Of the two books, Editor John Lavin said: ‘I’m delighted to tell you that The Lonely Press will publish two new titles in the spring of 2017. The first is quite simply a classic short story collection – The Beautiful Rooms by Valerie Sirr. When we first started last year, we set out to be the ‘New Home of the Short Story’ and I can hardly believe our luck that we are able to publish the debut collection of such a talented, award-winning short story writer as our first book. The collection is psychologically complex, emotionally uncompromising and expertly crafted, as Valerie’s startling story ‘Made You Look’, illustrated so succinctly in our recent spring issue. I really do think that it is the perfect first short story collection for The Lonely Press to publish.

‘The other book we are publishing is a debut collection of poetry entitled Ergasy by Swansea MA student Chris Cornwell, a poet that we’ve published three times now in the Crowd – including two entirely scintillating poems in this current issue. Poetry has grown to be as integral to The Lonely Crowd as short fiction, and I believe that Chris is exactly the type of new young writer that we should be championing. I feel like it is probably the most ambitious debut poetry collection that I’ve read in a decade.’

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Issue Five of The Lonely Crowd

Meanwhile the new issue of The Lonely Crowd is now available to pre-order here. At 318 pages in length it is by far our largest anthology to date and one that is packed with work of scintillating quality and ambition from an array of acclaimed authors. The full list of contributors is as follows: Rachel Trezise. Gerald Dawe. Eimear Ryan. Uschi Gatward. Theophilus Kwek. Órfhlaith Foyle. John Freeman. Matthew David Scott. Susan Maiermoul. Katherine Duffy. Carla Manfredino. Hugh Fulham-McQuillan. Chris Cornwell. Craig Austin. Alix Nathan. Daniel Wade. Richard W. Strachan. Nick Black. Jo Mazelis. Jon Elcock. Ruth McKee. Jay Merill. Fred Johnston. Jonathan Taylor. Gary Raymond. Glyn Edwards. Jamie Guiney. Richard Redman. Sophie McKeand. Ian Steadman. Françoise Harvey. Tony Curtis. Rebecca Lawn. Kathy Groan.  It also contains an in-depth interview with Editor John Lavin by the prizewinning author, Susan Maiermoul.

Talking About Lobsters: New Writing Scotland 34

New Writing Scotland

Talking About Lobsters: New Writing Scotland 34

Talking About Lobsters: New Writing Scotland 34

Talking About Lobsters: New Writing Scotland 34 is the latest collection of excellent contemporary literature, from writers who are Scottish by birth, residence or inclination. Talking About Lobsters presents new work from more than fifty writers – some award-winning and internationally renowned, and some just beginning their careers.

Submissions are currently invited for New Writing Scotland 35, to be published in summer 2017. Successful contributors are paid on publication, and the deadline is 30 September!

Shooter invites submissions for “Cities”

The fifth issue of Shooter Literary Magazine will take the geographic theme of Cities, drawing upon the vitality and diversity of urban life – or, depending on the writer’s perspective, the grinding challenges of the crowded, fast-paced metropolis.

Writers may submit short fiction, non-fiction and poetry to do with historic, contemporary or futuristic cities, engaging with some aspect of the politics, pressures and allure of the urban experience. On the non-fiction side, insightful travel pieces revealing something unusual or unique about any city around the world are especially welcome.

Prose should fall between 2,000 and 7,500 words, and poets may submit up to three poems by October 16th, 2016. As always, Shooter seeks to uphold a high literary standard, so the quality of the writing is paramount. A vividly conjured urban setting is not enough to make a compelling story: we’re looking for pieces that explore some aspect of human experience unique to a city, stories that lead with character and illuminate the universal by means of the particular. Similarly, sharply observational, insightful poetry is preferred to obscure experimental fare.

For further guidelines on how to submit to Issue #5, please visit Shooter’s Submissions page. We look forward to reading your work!

The Short Anthology, Issue Two

The Short Anthology, Issue Two

The Short Anthology‘s Second Issue has launched.

Each issue of The Short Anthology is a collection of short stories based on photography. The second issue is based around 8 photographs Alma Haser took whilst on a trip back to her native Black Forest in Germany. 6 writers then used these photos as the inspiration for a short story. The stories are an eclectic mixture, ranging from an encounter with a strange beast deep in the German forests to the unearthing of a long held secret in a town in Nigeria.

The writers are:

  • Susan Sanford Blades, a writer living in Victoria, BC. Her short stories have been shortlisted for the Short Grain contest, the Peter Hinchcliffe Fiction Award and the Alberta Magazines Showcase Awards.
  • Gary Budden, co-director of Influx Press and an editorial assistant at Unsung Stories. His work has appeared in numerous journals, magazines and websites. He writes about landscape, punk and more at www.newlexicons.com.
  • Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, who lives in Abuja, Nigeria. His writing has been nominated for the Caine Prize for African Writing and his first novel, Season of Crimson Blossoms, was published in 2015 by Parrésia Publishers in Nigeria and Cassava Republic Press in the UK.
  • Anna Metcalfe, who had her first collection of short fiction, Blind Water Pass & Other Stories published by John Murray in May 2016.
  • Elizabeth Mikesch, the author of Niceties: Aural Ardor, Pardon Me (Calamari, 2014) and the co-founder of ( . y . ) press, an all-girl publishing project. She also performs contemporary folk arias as Fat Friend. She lives in Detroit, Michigan.
  • May-Lan Tan, the author of the short story collection Things to Make and Break (CB Editions, 2014) and the chapbook Girly (Future Tense, 2014). She lives in London.

The Second Issue is available to buy here: www.theshortanthology.com

If you didn’t get the first issue you can buy it along the the second issue in a special deal, go to www.theshortanthology.com to order.

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Are You on the Right Track?

The A3 Review has launched a short story and flash fiction Critique Service. Stories up to 5,000 words will receive detailed feedback and guidance from The A3 Review‘s editor, Shaun Levin, and guest editor, KM Elkes.

Find out more about the Critique Service and the Editors here.

This month’s A3 Review contest is the last chance to qualify for inclusion in Issue 5.The theme is TRACKS. Some things to think about for inspiration: Write about tracks listened to and tracks run on. Your favourite track, the song or tune that sends you back, the track you’ve played on a loop or cannot bear to hear. Use your favourite music track as inspiration (listen to it as you write). Write about the karaoke tracks you’d choose, the tracks that make you want to dance or cry. What do you listen to when working out or running (on a track!). Write from the musician’s point of view about cutting a track. Write or draw or photograph other types of tracks: ones you follow through woods or across fields; picking up the track of someone or something. Think train tracks, bike tracks, tracking someone online; the inside and outside tracks, being on the right track – or even the wrong track! Don’t backtrack. Make tracks. Explore the fast track, the wrong side of the tracks, or the one-track mind. Are you keeping track? Then enter the contest here.

We welcome short fiction, graphic stories, memoir, photographs, illustrations or any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 panel. The deadline is 27 August 2016.

Guest editor and award-winning author KM Elkes will choose two winners from the contest to go into Issue #5, to be published next month (September). All winning entries will receive Writing Maps and contributor copies, while three overall winners receive cash prizes (1st = £150; 2nd = £75; 3rd = £50).

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