Elbow Room and As Yet Untitled- A Crowd Funding Campaign.

The Elbow Room Prize is officially completed for 2015. The winners are announced, the anthology is on sale and our event was a resounding success. We can’t wait to do it all again next year. Bu that is next year and this is now. And we have a plan we need your help with.

As some of you may know Elbow Room is published by As Yet Untitled. Specialising in limited edition, handmade books Elbow Room has long been at the very centre of the press. Since launching all those years ago Elbow Room has grown and amazed us is so many ways. The support and community we have built is incredible but it is time to do more: more with Elbow Room and more with As Yet Untitled itself.

After much conversation and planning we are taking the next steps in our journey.

From next year onwards As Yet Untitled will be collaborating with some incredible artists and writers to create new artists’ books.

Books but not as you know.

Unusual, exciting and fantastical books.

Books that tell stories and explore narrative.

To do this we need your help.

We have started a crowd funding campaign on Kickstarter to raise the funds we need to buy equipment and material for this next stage. Crowd funding is something we feel passionately about. It is the chance for the public to act as patrons to the arts. It is only with your support that we will be able to start work on creating and releasing these new books. Nor are we going to forget about Elbow Room. Everything we buy for the press will help make Elbow Room an even more beautifully crafted pamphlet, increase our print runs, allow us to have a wider distribution and greater promotion. Even the smallest pledge makes the biggest difference.

We have carefully selected every reward we are offering to reflect the project and hope there is something there for everyone. All the details (including a video in which you get to watch The Elbow Room Prize anthology being made) are HERE on our project page.

If you enjoy the arts, books, and storytelling we need your support. Your pledge to our Kickstarter not only helps us but all the artists’ and writers we work with. Help us pay it forward.

Take a look, pledge and share the details far and wide.

Thank you for helping to make our dreams a reality.

Don’t Do It: Issue #8 – Noise

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Issue 8 of Don’t Do It is now live!

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Featuring an interview with NTS Live DJ Debi Ghose

Poems from Roy Moller, Catherine Edmunds and Jerrold Lam

Plus an essay on Andrew WK from Sarah Broadhurst:

I guess I have to now admit that my opinion changed – I learnt to love Andrew WK. I embraced ‘Party Hard’ as the joyful paean to having a great time that it is. To me his music is fun and energetic, and well meaning. You can party together, you can party any time, you can party to forget your rubbish job – WK even implores us to “have a crazy party by yourself!” on album opener ‘It’s Time to Party’. Sure you’re probably not going to have a spiritual awakening listening to I Get Wet but who the hell knows – maybe you might? Andrew WK’s music certainly gets tarred with being mindless and empty and ‘unworthy’. What even is emptiness in music? What does something need to sound like to be ‘full’? Why are so many reviewers full of such shit?

And we talk to artist Michael Pybus about Pikachu, Ikea, and why cafes have such awful decor:

We started visually before we had text. Cave paintings. Text takes longer to consume and people are more time-conscious now. We’re going back to hieroglyphics, to emojis: you look at the image and it’s shorthand for something else. I read that the most used word last year was the heart symbol – it wasn’t even a word anymore, just the heart emoji. And I thought, ‘God, I do use it a lot, actually.’ You’re not going to write ‘Love it’, you just put a heart and people know. I don’t know if ‘likes’ are enough now. Facebook’s too curated. Instagram’s a lot less about saying ‘I’ve got an amazing, interesting life’ and more about showing how you look at the world, the visual language. It’s a diary. When you look through people’s Instagrams, they’re all pretty coherent – you can get a sense of the person and what they look at. It’s less about status.

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Read it here now.

Words And Women Celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8th

 

Words And Women is celebrating International Women’s Day, Sunday March 8th, with the double launch of their latest showcase collection of short prose by women writers in the East of England and the first public performance of their About new writing commissions.

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The event, held in the heart of Norwich, is traditionally a vibrant and eclectic programme of readings, music, film and theatre.  This year, Words and Women’s competition winner, Lora Stimson will read her story, Cornflake Girl, alongside other writers included in the anthology, Julianne Pachico, Anna Metcalfe and Holly McDede. Singer-songwriter Meg Burrows will bring her rich singing voice.

Words And Women: Two published by Unthank Books, builds on the success of last year’s inaugural competition and anthology, shortlisted for the national Saboteur Awards 2014. It has been praised as “a bold and insightful collection containing much vigorous writing…’’ RM Bond-Webster, Eastern Daily Press.

This year the winning entries embody vivid imagination and ambiguity, delicate and subtle prose coupled with strong images and deep emotions.

The ‘About’ texts, supported by Arts Council England and written by Jenny Ayres, Lillie Ferrari, Tess Little and Thea Smiley, bring to life the voices of Jane Sellars hung in Norwich for being ‘idle at Trowse’, a woman who walks the Bungay Straight on a pilgrimage of grief, 18 year old prostitute ‘Anguish’ locked up in a mental asylum for life and Station Mistress Appleton and her wartime fight for the right to wear a company coat. The extracts are performed by Hetty Rance, Etta Geras, Isabelle King and Jenny Ayres and directed by Adina Levay.

‘The writers, performers and musicians have put their hearts into this year’s event. As always, it is going to be very special,’ said Belona Greenwood, Co-organiser, Words And Women.

The event is between 4 and 6 pm on Sunday, 8th March in Fusion at the Forum, Millennium Plain, Norwich. NR2 1TF.  It is free to attend and open to all. Men, women and children.

 

Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Friends and open submissions for the new look SUT Blog

SUT-Poster-September

You are discordially invited to our Edinburgh Fringe reunion party: Tragic Friends

The best tragedy at the Edinburgh Fringe was found at Stand Up Tragedy as the show returned for another successful year as part of the PBH Free Fringe. Performers bringing an hour of daily tragedy to the stage included Stewart Lee, Eddie Pepitone, Rob Auton, @ProResting and more. By combining established and upcoming acts, a different blend of sadness and catharsis was created in every show. We were also podcasting the highlights of the run, which we are continuing to share on iTunes and on Soundcloud.

To bring the spirit of the tragic Fringe back to London, Stand Up Tragedy will be jerking the tears and staring into the void with a line-up of old friends and new discoveries. If you missed the Edinburgh adventure, or if you just can’t get enough tragedy, get the full experience at this special reunion show.

‘takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth’ The Independent

‘an entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs’ The London Word

WHAT: Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Friends

WHERE: The Dogstar, 389 Coldharbour Ln, London SW9 8LQ

WHEN: 7.30pm-11pm, Thursday 25th September

HOW MUCH: Pay What You Like

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Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh until they cry and cry until they laugh. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it too seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

Stand Up Tragedy creates evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for the night and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out as a weekly podcast.

 

Call for Submissions:

To celebrate the triumphant return of Stand Up Tragedy to the Edinburgh Fringe, we are relaunching the SUT blog with an updated look and a new focus. Like its raucous live counterpart, the Stand Up Tragedy blog will be a place find the humour of hurt, the tickle of tragedy and mirth of misfortune. Selected work will posted each Friday beginning 1st August and promoted via the Stand Up Tragedy London monthly events, the podcast and at the Edinburgh Fringe.

What: short stories (fiction and non-fiction), flash fiction, poetry, and experimental form (that can be digitally distributed) that fits with the theme of tragicomedy. Or comitragedy.  Ideal length is 250-1000 words, though shorter pieces, and longer work that can be serialised, will be considered. Editorial support or feedback can be offered to those who request it.

Format: Word doc or docx – double spaced—name and title on every page and paginated, please.

Deadline: Rolling.

Please email to akshoosmith@gmail.com with “SUT Submission” in the subject line.
In the press:

“Laugh? I Nearly Died: The Rise of Stand-Up Tragedy” (Independent, July 2012)

“Stand-Up Tragedy” (London Word, January 2013)

One of the Guardian’s “Ten Great Storytelling Nights” (March 2014)

“Stand-up comedy with Sophocles and Justin Bieber during World Cup football” (John Fleming, June 2014)

Listen for yourself via the podcast: https://soundcloud.com/standuptragedy

Stand Up Tragedy: Taking the Tragedy to Edinburgh and open submissions for the new look SUT Blog

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Stand Up Tragedy is returning to Edinburgh to be part of PBH’s Free Fringe. Aiming to deliver a much-needed dose of misery to the festival, this time they’re coming for a full run—maximum tragedy. Each day is a different line-up, with acts including Josie Long, Rob Auton, Mathew Highton and Richard Tyrone Jones.

WHERE: Banshee Labyrinth (Venue 156), 29-35 Niddry Street, EH1 1LG

WHEN: 7.30pm-8.30pm, August 2nd -August 24th

HOW MUCH: Nothing. It’s on the Free Fringe.

‘takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth’-The Independent

‘an entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs’-The London Word

Show extracts will be going out as podcasts via iTunes, Soundcloud and other podcast networks during the festival.

Go on. Let the bastards get you down!

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh until they cry and cry until they laugh. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it too seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

Combining established acts such as Robin Ince, Andy Zaltzman, Grace Petrie, Sara Pascoe and Helen Arney with new and upcoming acts, Stand Up Tragedy creates evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for the night and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out as a weekly podcast.

Call for Submissions:

To celebrate the triumphant return of Stand Up Tragedy to the Edinburgh Fringe, we are relaunching the SUT blog with an updated look and a new focus. Like its raucous live counterpart, the Stand Up Tragedy blog will be a place find the humour of hurt, the tickle of tragedy and mirth of misfortune. Selected work will posted each Friday beginning 1st August and promoted via the Stand Up Tragedy London monthly events, the podcast and at the Edinburgh Fringe.

What: short stories (fiction and non-fiction), flash fiction, poetry, and experimental form (that can be digitally distributed) that fits with the theme of tragicomedy. Or comitragedy.  Ideal length is 250-1000 words, though shorter pieces, and longer work that can be serialised, will be considered. Editorial support or feedback can be offered to those who request it.

Format: Word doc or docx – double spaced—name and title on every page and paginated, please.

Deadline: Rolling. New pieces to be posted weekly beginning 1st August.

Please email to akshoosmith@gmail.com with “SUT Submission” in the subject line.

Stand-Up-Tragedy-poster_EDINBURGH-2014In the press:

“Laugh? I Nearly Died: The Rise of Stand-Up Tragedy” (Independent, July 2012)

“Stand-Up Tragedy” (London Word, January 2013)

One of the Guardian’s “Ten Great Storytelling Nights” (March 2014)

“Stand-up comedy with Sophocles and Justin Bieber during World Cup football” (John Fleming, June 2014)

 

Listen for yourself via the podcast: Tragic Christmas

Don’t Do It Issue Five: Electricity

Issue Five: Electricity

As we find our dials increasingly tuned to the pleasures, excesses and pitfalls of our digital age and format, Don’t Do It approaches technology — like everything else — aslant.

In this issue, our fifth, we turn to electricity in all its iterations: as substance, as metaphor, as power source, as frisson.

Our usual host of crackling fiction and poetry is joined by essays on all things electrical, two interviews with hypertext author  Michael Joyce and actor-novelist-playwright Neil Bartlett, a music mix and, if you hunt, more than one video.

Plug in, play, and enjoy.

-The Editors

Featuring fiction from Ayesha Siddiqi, Richard Kostelanetz, Paul McMichael, DS Maolalaí, Gill Haigh and Tal Bibas.
Essays by Betsy Lewis-Holmes, Richard Bosch, Robert Stagg and Stephanie Boland.
Music by Debi Ghose of, among other venues, NTS radio.

Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Misadventures

Tragic Misadventures: Some super hot live event slash fic!

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Two nights enter, one night leaves: Stand Up Tragedy and Romantic Misadventure team up to delivery a night of tragically romantic variety.

Wednesday 9th July at the Blackheart in Camden
7.30pm till late

Featuring Helen ArneyHayley CampbellRadcliffe RoydsNell FrizzellAllan GirodLily PotkinGloria SandersJoel Golby

Hosted by Kit Lovelace and Dave Pickering.

Plus: Tragic Tales: Story Snappers from J Adamthwaite, the unveiling of some Tragic Scents created for SUT by Jo Barratt from Life in Scents and a Tragic Tombola! Plus live art from Liam Willday.

Tickets in advance £5 from: http://bit/ly/TragicFringe

Tickets on the door: £7

Proceeds from the night go towards taking Stand Up Tragedy to the Edinburgh Fringe as part of Spoken Word at PBH’s Free Fringe. We’ll be at the Banshee Labyrinth from 2nd-24th.
SUT-Poster-JULY

Only Human, Issue 4 of Spontaneity

 

Thehardingmeyer beautiful summer issue of Spontaneity is here! Issue four of the magazine Only Human brings you poetry, prose and art that detail everything from first love to last love, from sexual affairs to questions of the heart, from loss to longing. Established voices and emerging writers all relate to previous work in the magazine, forming a chain reaction of words, pictures and music.

Click on the links to see the incredible connections — and if an idea strikes you then why not be part of it and submit your own response? Follow us on twitter @spontaneity_art  on Facebook and be part of the project! Contact editor@spontaneity.org

Don’t Do It Issue Four: Translations

 Issue Four

Issue Four of Don’t Do It  is now live.

Purpose

This time, we turn to translation — literal and metaphorical — to explore language, interdisciplinarity, technology, poetry, inter-personal translations and the craft of fiction.

Ingredients

The issue includes essays on Knausgård, Beckett, chess and the practicalities of translation, new short stories and poetry, and two interviews, with Chilean composer Nicolás Kliwadenko and an editor and poet from the new A Bird is Not A Stone collection.

Effects

An increased interest in Russian literature; gentle yearning; excess knowledge of chess; a desire to learn Scots; a desire for new music; a questioning of love, words, meaning and beauty.

 Enjoy!

— The Editors

 

Stand Up Tragedy: Greek Tragedy

On June 12th Stand Up Tragedy are putting the sic into classics as we return to the birthplace of tragic narrative, and gather together performers from across the genres to put on night of Greek Tragedy.

Highlights will be Andy Zaltzman making use of his classics degree, ukulele tragedy from cabaret mistress Tricity Vogue, mythic poems from David Lee Morgan and some excellent nonsense from comedian Joz Norris. The line-up includes theatre, spoken word, comedy, storytelling and traditional greek folksongs.

Expect each act to take you to a completely different place, while host, Sony and Radio Academy Award nominated podcaster, storyteller and writer, Dave Pickering, guides you through the cathartic twists and turns.

SUT-Poster-June

What is Stand Up Tragedy?

It “takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth.”
The Independent

An “entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs”
The London Word

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh until they cry and cry until they laugh. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it too seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

At Stand Up Tragedy, we combine established acts like Robin Ince, Josie Long, Ben Target, Grace Petrie, Sara Pascoe, Helen Zaltzman, Simon Munnery and Helen Arney with new and upcoming acts, creating evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for our nights and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out into a weekly podcast.

Stand Up Tragedy were selected as one of the Guardian’s 10 national storytelling nights.

To get a taste of the tragedy have a listen to our podcast.

 

HeadStuff wants you.

HeadStuff logo, brain speech bubble, HeadStuff.org HeadStuff.org is a new website. And oh! it’s a wonderful place. We are interested in everything that we think is interesting. We love literature like this and we are always open to submissions. We accept basically everything with two stipulations.

1: It has to be interesting and

2: it has to be good.

We have stories, poems, criticism, reviews, essays… basically, anything literary is in our literature section.

We also have great Science like this and lovely Art like this and sometimes we merge the two. We find History very interesting and it can be funny, but maybe not quite as funny as the stuff in our Humour section. We love Music and Film and we’re also into what’s going on in the world.

Every month we have a new Legend of the Month which has proven very popular, and we even leave a clue at the bottom of each new Legend post so that readers can try to guess the next legend, and win a legend-related prize.

If you are interested in contributing to any of these sections, or even multiple sections like a lot of our contributors do, then please feel free to send an email to Editor@HeadStuff.org and you can see each of our contributors here.

Hey, even if you have an idea or a suggestion, maybe you’re uncertain about a topic, or you have an idea for a serialized or recurring piece, get in touch and we’ll talk.

We’re very happy to be involved with ShortStops, and very delighted that you read this all the way to the end. Go you. You get an A.

Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Martrys

Come and share some sacrificial offerings at our tragic variety show!

This March Stand Up Tragedy is celebrating Tragic Martyrs at the Dogstar in Brixton featuring The Story Beast, Deborah Francis-White, Alice Bell, Dzifa Benson, The Sound of the Ladies, Jonathan Hansler and more will be exploring the idea of Tragic Martyrs with stories, sketch comedy, spoken word, music, comedy, magic and everything in between.

Each act will contrast and compare in interesting ways with the last one as host Sony and Radio Academy Award nominated podcaster, storyteller and writer Dave Pickering attempts to control this rollercoaster of catharsis.

SUT-Poster-APRIL

What is Stand Up Tragedy?

It “takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth.”
The Independent

An “entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs”
The London Word

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh cry until they laugh and laugh until they cry. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

At Stand Up Tragedy we combine established acts like Robin Ince, Josie Long, Ben Target, Grace Petrie, Sara Pacoe ,Simon Munnery and Helen Arney with new and upcoming acts in long form evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for our nights and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out into a weekly podcast

To get a taste of the tragedy you can already hear our last three show’s Tragic ChristmasTragic Beginnings  and Tragic Love in full on our podcast and Tragic Love will come out over the next few weeks.

We’re have a monthly fanzine that we sell at the live shows. We are accepting short pieces of writing (under 400 words) and pictures for the fanzine (send to upstandingtragedy@gmail.com), upcoming themes are Tragic Martyrs and Tragic History.

Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Heroes

We can be tragic heroes just for one night!

This March Stand Up Tragedy is celebrating Tragic Heroes at the Hackney Attic featuring The Beta Males, Michelle Madsen, Samantha Mann, MJ Hibbett, Worry Dolls and more will be searching for the tragic hero inside themselves.

From Shakespearean heroes to Superheroes, the narrative of great people who have bad stuff happen to them will stories, sketch comedy, spoken word, music,  comedy and everything in between.

Each act will contrast and compare in interesting ways with the last one as host Sony and Radio Academy Award nominated podcaster, storyteller and writer Dave Pickering attempts to control this rollercoaster of catharsis.

SUT_Poster-MARCH
What is Stand Up Tragedy?

It “takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth.”
The Independent

An “entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs”
The London Word

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh cry until they laugh and laugh until they cry. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

At Stand Up Tragedy we combine established acts like Robin Ince, Josie Long, Ben Target, Grace Petrie, Sara Pacoe ,Simon Munnery and Helen Arney with new and upcoming acts in long form evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for our nights and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out into a weekly podcast

To get a taste of the tragedy you can already hear our last two show’s Tragic Christmas and Tragic Beginnings in full on our podcast and Tragic Love will come out over the next few weeks.

We’re have a monthly fanzine that we sell at the live shows. We are accepting short pieces of writing (under 400 words) and pictures for the fanzine (send to upstandingtragedy@gmail.com), upcoming themes are Tragic Martyrs and Tragic History.

Stand Up Tragedy: Tragic Heroes

We can be tragic heroes just for one night!

This March Stand Up Tragedy is celebrating Tragic Heroes at the Hackney Attic featuring The Beta Males, Michelle Madsen, Samantha Mann, MJ Hibbett, Worry Dolls and more will be searching for the tragic hero inside themselves.

From Shakespearean heroes to Superheroes, the narrative of great people who have bad stuff happen to them will stories, sketch comedy, spoken word, music,  comedy and everything in between.

Each act will contrast and compare in interesting ways with the last one as host Sony and Radio Academy Award nominated podcaster, storyteller and writer Dave Pickering attempts to control this rollercoaster of catharsis.

SUT_Poster-MARCH
What is Stand Up Tragedy?

It “takes in everything from music to comedy and is characterised by an emphasis on truth.”
The Independent

An “entertaining bunch of melancholic oddballs”
The London Word

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh cry until they laugh and laugh until they cry. It’s a monthly live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

At Stand Up Tragedy we combine established acts like Robin Ince, Josie Long, Ben Target, Grace Petrie, Sara Pacoe ,Simon Munnery and Helen Arney with new and upcoming acts in long form evenings of variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for our nights and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out into a weekly podcast

To get a taste of the tragedy you can already hear our last two show’s Tragic Christmas and Tragic Beginnings in full on our podcast and Tragic Love will come out over the next few weeks.

We’re have a monthly fanzine that we sell at the live shows. We are accepting short pieces of writing (under 400 words) and pictures for the fanzine (send to upstandingtragedy@gmail.com), upcoming themes are Tragic Martyrs and Tragic History.

Holdfast Magazine Call for submissions

ImageWe are now accepting submissions for Issue#2: Animals, Beasts & Creatures. Are you fascinated by what lurks within and what hides in the shadows? We look at the relationship between speculative fiction and animals, whether talking badgers or fire-breathing dragons.

Deadline for fiction and poetry January 20 2014. Go to our submissions page for more information. For any queries not covered please contact us at submissions@holdfastmagazine.com

Issue#1: Speculating about Speculative Women is out now at www.holdfastmagazine.com

“In an age when book blogs and eZines seem to crop up every twenty three and a half minutes, Holdfast has done it right – interesting features, diverting fiction, music and literary challenges – and that’s just in the first issue! I for one can’t wait to see where it goes from here.”

– Lee Harris, Senior Editor, Angry Robot and former Publisher of Hub Magazine.

Read speculative fiction, poetry, interviews, articles, reviews and other oddments all whilst listening to our fantasy playlist. Take part in co-authoring a story with featured author Emma Newman in our Story Chain. Discover what’s making Emma Newman angry, read Eva Kerslake-Blue’s short story Mirror, Mirror (and then read her bio!), peruse books written and inhabited by speculative women on our Bookshelf, and find out about the underrepresentation of Black women in science fiction.

Each issue revolves around a central theme, examining genre fiction through focussed articles, fiction and reviews. Linked to this is each issue’s interview with a featured author, whose writing connects to the issue’s topic. Regular features include The Unbelievers, in which our two heroic editors attempt to convert self-confessed fantasy haters, a themed playlist that gives readers a suitable atmosphere in which to browse, and A Letter To… tells an author how influential and inspiring they are.

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 Illustration by Zoe Ann Lee for poem ‘The Crown’ by Rebecca Manser

@holdfastmag http://www.facebook/holdfastmag submissions@holdfastmagazine.com

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