Deadline Day is Coming! London Independent Story Prize

Just a few days left until the Deadline! 10th of January!

Polish those 300-word short-short stories and take your chance. Become a part of this wonderful community of writers and storytellers. Take the chance of winning the prize! Give your story a chance to be recognised.

Check out the 2018 Calendar from here LISP.

LISP judges are looking for strong and unique voices, check out the interviews with the judges on the website.

‘Originality must come from other resources: from one’s own voice, personality, character.’ Luis Pizarro, LISP judge.

‘Given that the story can only be 300 words, I am looking for something beyond the ephemeral, a story that will make an impression.’ James Kirchick, LISP judge.

‘LISP is based on creating a great community and, of course, all the writers who attend the competition will definitely be a part of this network. However, winners are winners, and they will have the greatest advantage. First of all, the prize and publication, and when you win a competition, it means that your pen has been recognised, which is a great feature for any writer. Not only while trying to reach agents or publishers, but also the personal satisfaction is priceless. Especially for young writers, it’s a way to build confidence.

As an award winner, I can also say that it helps you to improve. Now you see that you can write things that others appreciate as well, which encourages you to be even bolder.’ Ozge Gozturk, LISP founder.

Countdown To Deadline – Polish That Prose

WORDS AND WOMEN ANNUAL NEW WRITING COMPETITION – GET YOUR ENTRIES IN!

Deadline Midnight, 15th November 2017

Win the national prize for women over 40 of £1,000 and a month’s writing residency provided by Hosking Houses Trust and a regional prize (East of England) of £600 and a mentoring session with Jill Dawson of Gold Dust.Poster 2017 Online low res

Winning entries will be published online and in a Compendium of Words and Women’s best entries from the last 4 prize-winning anthologies.

Entries can be fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction and life-writing on any theme.

2,200 words

Guest judges: Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney, authors of A Secret Sisterhood: The hidden friendship of Austen, Bronte, Eliot and Woolf. 

National prize open to women writers over the age of 40. Regional prize open to women writers over the age of 16 living or working in the East of England.

For more details email wordsandwomencomp@gmail.com or visit our blog at www.wordsandwomennorwich.blogspot.co.uk

Submissions open for Shooter’s “New Life” issue

Submissions have reopened for Shooter Literary Magazine‘s issue #7 with the theme of “New Life”.

As always, the theme is open to interpretation. In addition to the subject of birth, writers might like to consider themes to do with renewal, invention and reinvention. “New Life” could conjure starting over later in life; giving someone a chance at a critical time; rescuing animals or people, perhaps through adoption; second chances and opportunities that radically change someone’s circumstances. Non-fiction to do with trying to get pregnant, birth or parenting (from either a personal or political perspective) is particularly welcome. Poetry should incline to the observational rather than experimental end of the spectrum.

Literary fiction, creative non-fiction and narrative journalism should fall between 2,000 and 7,500 words. Please submit only one story or up to three poems per issue. Simultaneous submissions are welcome but let us know if your work is accepted elsewhere. All work must be previously unpublished either in print or online. Successful writers receive payment and a copy of the issue.

Please read the guidelines at Shooter’s Submissions page before sending your work. The deadline for issue #7, which comes out this winter, is November 5th.

In addition to general submissions to the magazine, poets might like to submit verse on any theme to Shooter’s 2017 Poetry Competition. Further details can be found at https://shooterlitmag.com/poetry-competition.

Is writing for DNA Magazine on your list of things to do?

Are you curious about what goes on in the lives of other people? Ever wondered just how differently the person sat next to you views the world? Or wanted to re-live a moment from somebody else’s point of view?

If any of these apply to you, DNA Magazine is probably the literary journal for you.

These days, it’s all too easy for us to stick labels on people and dismiss them. These labels — millennials, baby-boomers, liberals, Tories, alt-righters, Brexiters/Bremainers, feminists etc we all hear them ­ — turn people in to caricatures, shallow characters defined by the stereotypes of that group. They create divisions and stifle empathy as individual stories are lost. We become nameless and faceless, statistics rather than people.

My goal for DNA Magazine is to publish stories that celebrate the lives and memories of ordinary people. To remind people of the experiences and events that make each of us different and unique. It’s harder to dismiss people when you hear about their personal experiences. Not all of us will do great things that will set us apart and be worthy of record in a full-length memoir, but all of us have interesting stories that we can share.

The first issue of DNA Magazine will be published at the end of May. Submissions are currently open for 300-500 word non-fiction pieces that are inspired by the theme of lists. These lists can be as simple as a shopping list or something more visual such as a group of people in a photograph, a collection of objects or locations. A list might be a series of ingredients that go into an old family recipe or a selection of facts that hint at a bigger personal story. You don’t have to include the list in your piece of writing — you might just reference something on it — I just want to find out about the hidden stories behind that list.

So far, I’ve had a varied selection of lists — everything from a list of closed London Underground stations to old playlists, to a group of people one writer sees at the bus stop every day to the items on another writer’s bed side table.

If you have a piece of writing you’d like to submit, please send it (with a photograph or copy of your list) to submissions@dnamag.co.uk. Submissions close on 24th March 2017. The submission guidelines can be found at www.dnamag.co.uk.

 

Katie Marsden

(DNA Magazine Curator)

Story Sunday in Bristol: call for submissions

Let us tell you another story ….landscape-409551_960_720

Writers Unchained of Bristol are delighted to announce the next Story Sunday event will be on March 19th.

Our theme this time is Another Country and we are open to any genre of prose fiction or memoir

  • wordcount 500 – 1500
  • stories can be published or unpublished as long as you have the right to read it out.
  • deadline midnight Sunday March 5th
  • only submit if you can read on Sunday March 19th between 7 and 9 pm at Southbank Club, Dean Lane, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 1DB.

There’s more detailed information on how to submit on our website.

Don’t forget this is also an event for those who just enjoy listening!

Tickets for our audience  will be £5 on the door.

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Shooter invites submissions for “Cities”

The fifth issue of Shooter Literary Magazine will take the geographic theme of Cities, drawing upon the vitality and diversity of urban life – or, depending on the writer’s perspective, the grinding challenges of the crowded, fast-paced metropolis.

Writers may submit short fiction, non-fiction and poetry to do with historic, contemporary or futuristic cities, engaging with some aspect of the politics, pressures and allure of the urban experience. On the non-fiction side, insightful travel pieces revealing something unusual or unique about any city around the world are especially welcome.

Prose should fall between 2,000 and 7,500 words, and poets may submit up to three poems by October 16th, 2016. As always, Shooter seeks to uphold a high literary standard, so the quality of the writing is paramount. A vividly conjured urban setting is not enough to make a compelling story: we’re looking for pieces that explore some aspect of human experience unique to a city, stories that lead with character and illuminate the universal by means of the particular. Similarly, sharply observational, insightful poetry is preferred to obscure experimental fare.

For further guidelines on how to submit to Issue #5, please visit Shooter’s Submissions page. We look forward to reading your work!

A Very Topical Story

Read Paper Republic hasn’t posted on Short Stops for a while, but we’ve haven’t stopped publishing our weekly short stories translated from the best of contemporary Chinese fiction. I hope you’ve managed to catch some – there’s something there for all tastes.

Well, today’s a bit of a red-letter day. At the beginning of the week, the Chinese government announced the ending of its One-Child-Per-Family policy. At the same time, a talented young woman writer called LU Min wrote a thought-provoking, and thoughtful, story about her own family’s experiences during the years when the policy was at its most draconian. We’ve translated it and posted it here: https://paper-republic.org/pubs/read/a-second-pregnancy-1980/ . Here’s how Lu Min begins: ‘We often tease my little sister – “Your life’s worth 56 yuan” – so many years have passed that we no longer feel the pain, and we can see a funny side to it.’

Read, and enjoy.

A Second Pregnancy-LuMin-HWang: