Submission opportunity Flash Fiction February 2019

Four weeks left to get your story in for Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February 2019. Submissions close on midnight December 31 2018.

During Flash Fiction February we will feature a new piece of flash fiction throughout February 2019. That’s a new story, every day, starting on 1 February for the entire month. As always we’re interested in stories with a contemporary feel.

We’ve put a squeeze on our usual word count though, so only stories of between 200 – 750 words please.

Read our Flash Fiction February submission guidelines here.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

We’re looking forward to receiving your best work!

Laura Black
Editor

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That Killer First page, Dublin, Oct 13

That Killer First Page, Oct 13

Venue: Brooks Hotel, 62 Drury Street, Dublin 2.

Date: Oct 13    Time: 10.30-4.30

Places are limited. This event sold out in Adelaide, Bali, Bath, Belfast, Cork, Galway, Kuala Lumpur, Lancaster, London, Melbourne & Singapore.  

You’ll find out what competition judges and journal editors look for in a short story and how to avoid the rejection pile. You’ll write a short piece and get feedback on that crucial story opening. In a form where every word counts, get tips on staying focused on your story and where to start the action. You’ll also look at submission opportunities; how to find them and where you should be sending your stories.

Focus:
How to get the attention of competition judges and editors
Writing fiction with emotional impact
Writing that killer first page
How to edit your story
Where to send your work

Paul McVeigh’s short fiction has been published in anthologies and journals inc. The Stinging Fly and Faber’s ‘Modern Irish Writing’. Stories have been commissioned by BBC Radio 3, 4 & 5 and Sky Arts TV. He was shortlisted for Irish Short Story of the Year 2017 at the Irish Book Awards. His short story blog shares writing opportunities and advice and gets 40,000 hits a month and has had over 2 million views. He’s interviewed short story masters like Kevin Barry, Elizabeth McCracken and George Saunders for The Irish Times. Paul co-founded the London Short Story Festival and is Associate Director at Word Factory, the UK’s national centre for excellence in the short story. He is a judge for national and international short story competitions including, in 2018, the Sean O’Faolain Prize, the Edge Hill Prize and the International Dylan Thomas Prize. He is also the current fiction editor at Southword Journal where he recently commissioned Kit de Waal and twice Booker shortlisted Deborah Levy.                                                                                   

“I emerged from the sleepy hamlet of my writing infancy last Saturday and was sky-rocketed, hurricaned, tsunamied, autobahned and g-forced out of my head by Paul McVeigh’s “That Killer First Page” Masterclass at Waterstones, Piccadilly. He’s on top of his game, gives instinctive, constructive criticism and in a few short hours, had conveyed the essence of how to make a story compelling and unputdownable from the first few lines. Get on one of his courses if you can.”

Reviews for his short stories:
“Beautiful and very moving.” Booker shortlisted Alison Moore
“How moving and stunning that story is. It’s so raw and incredibly human.” Costa shortlisted Jess Richards
“(one of) Ireland’s most exciting and talented writers.  Incredibly moving; poignant but utterly real, funny and beautifully observant.” BBC Radio 4
“Paul McVeigh’s story stands out. Funny, moving, poignant. Brilliant.” Metro Newspaper

Paul’s debut novel The Good Son’ won 2 awards and was shortlisted for a further 5.

‘A work of genius…’ Pulitzer Prize-winning Robert Olen Butler

“Both dancing and disquieting, complex and vivid, I devoured it in a day, but I’ve thought about it for many, many more.” Bailey Prize-winner Lisa McInerney The Glorious Heresies                                       ‘

‘A triumph of storytelling. An absolute gem.’ Donal Ryan

Places are limited to 15

FOR CONCESSIONS PLEASE EMAIL: paulmcveighwriter@live.co.uk

Brooks are offering a special lunch deal – two tapas plus a glass of house wine at €18.50 per person.

PaulMcVeigh short story

Fictive Dream Special Call for Submissions

New from Fictive Dream is September Slam in which we will feature seven new short stories, one for each day of the week, from Monday 24th to Sunday 30th September 2018.

As always we’re interested in stories with a contemporary feel on any subject that gives an insight into the human condition. But here’s the twist. Your story must include two sentences courtesy of short story writer, novelist and publisher, Nicholas Royle.

Nicholas Royle is the author of three short story collections—Mortality (Serpent’s Tail), Ornithology (Confingo Publishing), The Dummy and Other Uncanny Stories (Swan River Press)—and seven novels, most recently First Novel (Vintage). He has edited more than twenty anthologies and is series editor of Best British Short Stories (Salt). Reader in Creative Writing at the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University, he also runs Nightjar Press and is head judge of the Manchester Fiction Prize.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

See our September Slam 2018 submission guidelines here.

For standard submissions (500–2,500 words) we remain open as usual.

We’re looking forward to receiving your best!

Laura Black
Editor

 

Issue 8 and a New Press, Perhaps

Issue 8 coverWe’ve been thinking that it could be fun to set up a small press. The A3 Press. Same kind of format as The A3 Review and Writing Maps, a place for writers and artists to publish short work. We’re imagining these beautifully designed chapbooks that fold out. Let us know what you think! If you click here, you’ll be taken to the survey.

We’re almost ready to start compiling Issue 8, The Gold Issue. This month is the last opportunity to be included in our next issue. The theme is brief encounters and the deadline is Saturday, 24th February. Quickies, chance meetings, a brief exchange that changes a life. Click here for all the details and some further suggestions. You can also pre-order a copy of Issue 8 here.

For all our future contest themes, check out our Submittable page.

Happy Writing!

The Birth of flash & cinder

flash & cinder is a new literary magazine dedicated to flash fiction and poetry encircling a single idea. Our first issue, Spirit, is due to be formally released in July 2018 to start of our summer/winter alternation. We love writing that pushes boundaries and dares to experiment.

We’ve already received bounties of wonderful flash fiction and poetry, but we’re always interested in reading more. We love literary magazines such as Smokelong Quarterly MagazineNew Flash Fiction Review and Magma Poetry, and want to build something that will eventually stand proudly among them.
twitter 2

We are open for submissions for our very first issue now! If you have flash fiction or poetry on the theme of Spirit, we’d love to read it. Poems may be up to and including 32 lines long, while flash fiction can only be up to 750 words.

If you’re interested, please submit up to three pieces to flashandcinder@gmail.com. Submissions close March 31st 2018.

We look forward to reading your work.
flash & cinder

Bunbury Issue 18…in your hands?

Well hello to you all from Bunbury Magazine, and a (possibly slightly late) Happy New Year 2019 because by golly that January was a long one! We hope you are all well and sticking to your resolution like the good ones that you are.

 

We’re back to let you know that WE’RE BACK! Bunbury has landed with a brand new issue. Number 18. Bunbury is now officially able to vote and drink. It’s applying to university and revising for A Levels. It’s a busy time at Bunbury HQ.

 

To the important part. The issue is available for you now and, for the very first time, you can literally get your hands on a copy! That’s right, we’re in print! You would not believe how excited we are about this. Bunbury 18 now comes in both physical and digital formats: the physical features all of the poetry, short stories and flash fiction. The digital comes with bonus content, including the Art & Photography section, Serials and Our Edinburgh Fringe 2017 feature! It’s a corker.

The physical copy is £5 and comes with an activation code to download the bonus content for free OR you can get the full digital version downloaded to your gadgets for £5. Choose your destiny below.

Bunbury Issue 18: The Hunt Physical Edition

Bunbury Issue 18: The Hunt Digital Edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We went with the theme of ‘The Hunt’ because Editor Keri was the loudest in the meeting room that day and started pretending to hunt everyone around the office. We don’t know why… We were afraid to ask.
Still, she’s stopped now and that’s the main thing.
We also thought it would be a darn good prompt. We hope it was.

This issue is another very special one, from the words, to the people, to the art, it’s just splendid from cover to cover.

As always, we’re bringing you excellent short stories, poetry, flash fiction and more alongside the usual stunning art work and in this one, we present for your delectation and delight, our adventures at the Edinburgh Fringe festival through our annual interviews. Also, allow me to take this opportunity to say that if you’ve never been to the Fringe, you really should. It’s a month of mayhem and wonder. Plus, haggis! What more could you ask for?

 

OTHER NEWS

Bunbury Issue 19 is now open for submissions. The theme for this one, you ask? Infinity we answer. As always, a big concept for you lovely, talented people to get your creative chops in to. For all of our guidelines for submitting to us, click on the submissions poster below. There’s lots of lovely info there!

 

Some of you may also know that we run spoken word events in our home town of Bury. If you didn’t know, you do now! They are also back up and running for 2018. The first one of the year was an absolute belter and we’re ramping up for the next one. It’s on 27th February in The Old White Lion in Bury. Our headliners are the absurdly talented Benjamin Guilfoyle and Fiona Nuttall. If you’re in the area (or even if you aren’t) come along. We have open mic spots available. For all the information, you know what to do (click the poster which will take you to a Facebook event where you can tell us you are coming!)

 

That’s all for now folks! As usual, come and find us on Facebook (Bunbury Magazine), Twitter (@BunburyPublish) and wherever they are serving a fine gin.

 

Tah-tah for now, dear Bunburyists!

Christopher and Keri.

Windows and Reminders

stamp windowWe’d like to remind you that Issue 7 of The A3 Review is here. Click here to order a copy. We’d also like to remind you that the November deadline for our monthly contest is just a few days away. November the 25th is when we start reading submissions for our WINDOWS-themed contest.

Click here for inspiration and prompts, and for submission details. You could write about windows you’ve looked into and windows you’ve looked out of. Or write about a character standing at a hotel window, witnessing something they’ll never forget, or something that makes them laugh. Look into the metafictional potential of the window

You could write about broken windows and throwing pebbles at a lover’s window. Write about glasshouses. Write about a particular type of window, anything from a witch window to a bay window. Write about eyes, for they are the window to the soul. Write about a character who loves to window shop, or a day in the life of a window dresser.

You could write about the windows in your day, or a character’s day and call it “All the Day’s Windows” or “A Day of Windows.” You could write a piece and start with the words: “The tiny window in his cell…” or “From the hospital bed she could see…” or, to steal the opening lines of a famous song: “Looking out on the pouring rain…”

This month’s contest is inspired by the Write Around the House Writing Map. As always, we welcome short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 panel.

One more reminder… our Brief Critique option is still only $15 (that’s about £11, depending on the state of the world on any specific day!). More and more writers are taking us up on the offer, and this is what some have said: “Very constructive. Good level of detail… Intelligent, direct, and useful suggestions for improvement.” For just $15 we’ll provide a line edit of your submission and feedback on ways to take your work to the next level. Choose the Brief Critique add-on, and you’ll be able to pay together with your entry fee. Critiques are provided after the month’s winning entries have been announced.

And one fnal reminder… Write! Write Write! Write wherever you are. Here’s some suggestions from The A3 Review‘s editor, Shaun Levin.