Call for Submissions – Short Stories & Poetry

Stories About Cyber Lives

Guts Publishing. Ballsy books about life. An independent publisher in London specializing in short story anthologies, fiction & nonfiction, and often with poetry. We also publish full-length memoirs. Our goal is to support exceptional writers to ensure that readers can find bold life stories (and that other stuff they call fiction) in the marketplace.

On 28 November 2019 we released our debut anthology Stories About Penises, a collection of 21 poems and short stories about, well exactly what it sounds like. We have some nice reviews on our website, and also on Goodreads.

We are thrilled to announce that we are open for submissions for our next anthology Stories About Cyber Lives. Seeking poetry and short stories (fiction & nonfiction) by UK writers. Which means anyone currently living in the UK, or anyone who was born in the UK. Closing date is 15 February 2020. This is wide open and anything goes (poetry, memoir, erotica, literary fiction, sci fi, lgbt, etc) as long as it aligns with the theme.

For details visit gutspublishing.com/submissions and our Submittable page.

We can’t wait to read your stories! xx Guts

Free Membership @JerichoWriters – LISP 4th Quarter 2018 News!

Writers! We have great news.

The London Independent Story Prize 4th Quarter Deadline is on 12th November 2018.  And beside the £200 cash prize, our winner will also receive One-Year Membership from Jericho Writers, which is worth £195.00!

LISP is accepting 300 Word Flash Fiction stories NOW! Deadline is coming, so hurry up.

Don’t miss the great prizes!

Jericho Writers is a club for writers, created by writers. They organise wonderful courses, webinars, one-to-one agent meetings, and great events that you can extend your network.

Simply, Jericho Writers is helping writers to get published.

Click to read the success stories!

Could you be next?

Please click the link to find out more about this wonderful platform!

AND CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR STORY !!

Haringey Literature Live – a wealth of Masterclasses and Short Writing Courses coming up

North London’s HARINGEY LITERATURE LIVE has an inspiring range of writing courses & Masterclasses coming up from April – June 2018.

Energising writing workshops on the Short Story, Life-Writing, the Novel and Poetry can be found here: http://haringeyliteraturelive.com/workshops-programme-autumn-2016-springsummer-2017/

Fabulous Masterclasses from successfully published writers kick off with novelist Helen Gordon here who will be giving expert advice to writers of both short and long fiction on Sunday April 29th: http://haringeyliteraturelive.com/writing-masterclasses/

http://haringeyliteraturelive.com

MEET THE WINNERS!

Words and Women are excited to announce the winners of their 2017/2018 national and KerryHood[50180]regional new writing competition.

Kerry Hood’s intriguing and ambitious short story, The Sunbathers, wins the national prize for women over 40, £1,000 and a month-long writing retreat at Church Cottage, Stratford-Upon-Avon, generously sponsored by Hosking Houses Trust.

Margaret Meyer has been awarded the East of England regional prize of £600 and a mentoring session with Gold Dust for her entry, The Once and Only First Lady Judge.

Guest judges, Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney were drawn to Hood’s voice which ‘felt original and full of verve,’ as well as the ‘thematically complex’ nature of the story

Kerry Hood is no stranger to competitions.  She has been shortlisted for the Bridport Prize five times, as well as broadcasting stories on BBC Radio 4.  She is an accomplished theatre writer with work produced at the Soho Theatre, and her play Meeting Myself Coming Back was selected as the Sunday Times Critics’ Choice. She has had residences at the National Theatre, Traverse and RADA.

rgaret Meyer has previously been a fiction editor, publisher, British Council Director of Literature and a reader-in-residence in Norfolk prisons. As a therapeutic arts practitioner she provides writing and reading-for-wellbeing programmes for ex-offenders. In 2016 she won a place on the Escalator writer development scheme run by Writers’ Centre Norwich and in 2017 she was awarded an Arts Council England grant towards her first novel, The Varieties of Flight.

The competition now in its fifth year and open to women writers is unusual because it offers an opportunity to enter not only fiction but non-fiction, memoir, and life-writing.  This years’ winning texts will appear alongside past successful entrants in a compendium of the best of women’s contemporary short prose, launched on International Women’s Day, March 8th, 2018.

‘Congratulations to our worthy winning writers.  We had 350 entries and picking the most distinctive and ambitious texts was no easy task.  We are grateful to our brilliant judges for making such bold selections, and we really look forward to launching our compendium which will feature not only this year’s compelling and engaging writing but the best of the best in past years,’ said Belona Greenwood, co-organiser of Words and Women.

‘It has been a very exciting year for women’s writing,’ said Lynne Bryan, co-organiser. ‘We are extremely grateful to our sponsors. Hosking Houses Trust is a unique charity which offers women over the age of 40 time in which to start, continue or complete interesting or innovative work, in a residency free from the pressures of everyday life.  Jill Dawson, author of nine novels and founder of Gold Dust mentoring scheme is a wonderful supporter of our regional award.

See Words and Women’s blog for more details. Words and Women

 

Deadline Day is Coming! London Independent Story Prize

Just a few days left until the Deadline! 10th of January!

Polish those 300-word short-short stories and take your chance. Become a part of this wonderful community of writers and storytellers. Take the chance of winning the prize! Give your story a chance to be recognised.

Check out the 2018 Calendar from here LISP.

LISP judges are looking for strong and unique voices, check out the interviews with the judges on the website.

‘Originality must come from other resources: from one’s own voice, personality, character.’ Luis Pizarro, LISP judge.

‘Given that the story can only be 300 words, I am looking for something beyond the ephemeral, a story that will make an impression.’ James Kirchick, LISP judge.

‘LISP is based on creating a great community and, of course, all the writers who attend the competition will definitely be a part of this network. However, winners are winners, and they will have the greatest advantage. First of all, the prize and publication, and when you win a competition, it means that your pen has been recognised, which is a great feature for any writer. Not only while trying to reach agents or publishers, but also the personal satisfaction is priceless. Especially for young writers, it’s a way to build confidence.

As an award winner, I can also say that it helps you to improve. Now you see that you can write things that others appreciate as well, which encourages you to be even bolder.’ Ozge Gozturk, LISP founder.

Countdown To Deadline – Polish That Prose

WORDS AND WOMEN ANNUAL NEW WRITING COMPETITION – GET YOUR ENTRIES IN!

Deadline Midnight, 15th November 2017

Win the national prize for women over 40 of £1,000 and a month’s writing residency provided by Hosking Houses Trust and a regional prize (East of England) of £600 and a mentoring session with Jill Dawson of Gold Dust.Poster 2017 Online low res

Winning entries will be published online and in a Compendium of Words and Women’s best entries from the last 4 prize-winning anthologies.

Entries can be fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction and life-writing on any theme.

2,200 words

Guest judges: Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney, authors of A Secret Sisterhood: The hidden friendship of Austen, Bronte, Eliot and Woolf. 

National prize open to women writers over the age of 40. Regional prize open to women writers over the age of 16 living or working in the East of England.

For more details email wordsandwomencomp@gmail.com or visit our blog at www.wordsandwomennorwich.blogspot.co.uk

TOKEN Magazine Issue 2 – Call for submissions

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TOKEN Magazine is calling for submissions for Issue 2, and this time we have a theme – BODIES. This can be interpreted as you wish.

We are accepting:

– Fiction/Non-fiction of up to 2500 words (maximum 2 pieces per submission).

– Artwork/Photography (maximum 4 pieces per submission) and a summary of your work to go alongside the piece(s).

– Illustrations – please send across recent illustrations, and once we have the writing sorted you will be given briefs.

With your submission we ask that you please also include your biography (max 200 words). If it is not obvious please can you also write why you feel you are under-represented in the arts and literature. It is important that you do this as we want Issue 2 to have as many diverse voices as possible.

Send your submissions to tokenmagazine@gmail.com by 15 July 2017 (midnight). Any submissions after this time will not be accepted.

Please note:

– We are not accepting poetry or academic essays for this issue.

– We are not accepting works published online or in print before, or that are currently under consideration.

– All contributors will get a complimentary copy of the magazine.

– This is a not-for-profit magazine.

Please follow the instructions above, if you do not your piece may not be considered.

For more information about TOKEN Magazine please see our website here or follow us on twitter here

 

Is writing for DNA Magazine on your list of things to do?

Are you curious about what goes on in the lives of other people? Ever wondered just how differently the person sat next to you views the world? Or wanted to re-live a moment from somebody else’s point of view?

If any of these apply to you, DNA Magazine is probably the literary journal for you.

These days, it’s all too easy for us to stick labels on people and dismiss them. These labels — millennials, baby-boomers, liberals, Tories, alt-righters, Brexiters/Bremainers, feminists etc we all hear them ­ — turn people in to caricatures, shallow characters defined by the stereotypes of that group. They create divisions and stifle empathy as individual stories are lost. We become nameless and faceless, statistics rather than people.

My goal for DNA Magazine is to publish stories that celebrate the lives and memories of ordinary people. To remind people of the experiences and events that make each of us different and unique. It’s harder to dismiss people when you hear about their personal experiences. Not all of us will do great things that will set us apart and be worthy of record in a full-length memoir, but all of us have interesting stories that we can share.

The first issue of DNA Magazine will be published at the end of May. Submissions are currently open for 300-500 word non-fiction pieces that are inspired by the theme of lists. These lists can be as simple as a shopping list or something more visual such as a group of people in a photograph, a collection of objects or locations. A list might be a series of ingredients that go into an old family recipe or a selection of facts that hint at a bigger personal story. You don’t have to include the list in your piece of writing — you might just reference something on it — I just want to find out about the hidden stories behind that list.

So far, I’ve had a varied selection of lists — everything from a list of closed London Underground stations to old playlists, to a group of people one writer sees at the bus stop every day to the items on another writer’s bed side table.

If you have a piece of writing you’d like to submit, please send it (with a photograph or copy of your list) to submissions@dnamag.co.uk. Submissions close on 24th March 2017. The submission guidelines can be found at www.dnamag.co.uk.

 

Katie Marsden

(DNA Magazine Curator)

Thinking of crowdfunding your short stories?

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Although it’s been around for a little while now, there’s still a slight wariness from writers considering the crowdfunding route as a way of getting their next set of short stories published. This is the route that allows writers to generate financial support from their personal and professional networks in exchange for physical rewards, and is emerging as an invaluable marketing tool for self-publishing authors as well as insightfully gauging the interest of a book early on, directly from potential readers.

‘It’s too much work’, ‘It’s not as prestigious’, ‘I might not get as much return for my book’ are all responses you might hear cautious authors giving as they assess their options. And for some books this might be true, but for others, crowdfunding is the route they wish was available years ago.

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The great thing about crowdfunding is that it’s the only form of publishing where readers can obtain the book directly from the author. It connects readers to the person behind the imagination, it attracts writers that are truly passionate about writing and sharing it with their readers, and it also invites readers to take ownership of what they love to read rather than simply judging a book from the safe confines of a bookshop.

You may not become the most famous author through the crowdfunding route, but you’ll certainly be able to grow a strong community of people committed to supporting your work. In addition, the satisfaction of shaping each stage of the writing, design and sharing of your literary masterpiece could be truly fulfilling.

‘With the introduction of crowdfunding, self-publishing no longer has to be a solo venture’. Positive Writer

And that’s where we come in. Here at GOODFRUIT we aim to address the two biggest hurdles to publishing and selling a book – obtaining funding and sourcing expertise. You’ll be able to gain both of these during your crowdfunding campaign through offering rewards in return for financial support (such as a copy of the book), as well as raising a team to help you (graphic designer, editor, printer).

So if you’re a budding or veteran writer we’d love to hear from you. Take a browse of the GOODFRUIT Lewis Literary Contest we’re launching – a contest searching for three writers who want to publish a story or publication they have written or working on. The GOODFRUIT Literary Contest will be calling for short story writers (including other genres) to step into the shoes of inspiring authors in history, to write and publish books with imagination and meaning, to challenge the hearts of readers and to bring their stories to fruition.

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Deadline: 23rd September

Rules and Entry Information: http://goodfruit.co/community/the-goodfruit-literary-contest/

Email literarycontest@goodfruit.co with any question

Dee Atkins is the Community Manager for GOODFRUIT, a new kind of crowdfunding platform where people pledge funds or skills to bring ideas enriching culture to fruition. Our mission is to make it as easy as possible for culturemakers (entrepreneurs, creators, authors) to launch and scale ideas/businesses. Dee loves a good book, second-hand stores and putting on new socks. dee@goodfruit.co

 

Future Way: Call for Submissions

Calling all doodlers, ponderers, writers, poets and dreamers!

Submit a short story for a chance to be part of an exciting and unique, collaborative public art project in Redcliffe, Bristol.


Following the success of the Bristol Story Trail earlier in the year, get ready for Future Way brought to you by Dream of a Shadow, an online project bridging the gap between reality and fantasy through storytelling.

Working with The Redcliffe Neighbourhood Development Forum (@MoreRedcliffe), Future Way seeks to engage the people of Redcliffe and the wider community of Bristol through a playful and exciting exploration of the area using storytelling.

This is an amazing opportunity for published authors and budding writers in Bristol to collaborate with artists, architects and community groups in a first-of-its-kind, art project which challenges the way we view our city.

King of Christmas Steps

Contributors are encouraged to think about how Redcliffe may be used in the future and set tales within this. Because of the nature of the project, the brief is quite specific and submissions must meet the following criteria:

  • All entries must be set in the future Redcliffe area (how far is up to you)
  • All entries should be in 3-5 sections of 250 words (max) each, forming a trail through the area
  • Each section is planned to be tagged to a specific point within Redcliffe, i.e. a wall, lamp post, street, door etc.

The deadline for submissions is Monday 20th April 2015, so there’s plenty of time to get writing.


Please look at the website for the full brief before getting the pens out!

For any queries tweet us @DoaSLiveFiction and be sure to follow to stay up to date!

Happy writing and good luck!

Bristol Story Trail Needs Writers!

Calling all doodlers, ponderers, writers, poets and dreamers!

Get ready for the Bristol Story Trail (starting 15th Feb 2015) brought to you by Dream of a Shadow, an online project bridging the gap between reality and fantasy through storytelling.

Dream of a Shadow is collaborating with published authors and budding writers in Bristol to map the city through the magic of storytelling in an event running alongside Bristol Storyfest 2015.

The more creative minds, the better. So we are currently looking for short story submissions from you – these can be as little as 50 words, or up to 1000 and should be based in Bristol (loosely in the area around Spike Island).

So take a moment and get involved in writing the city!

All stories submitted will be included in the Bristol Story Trail alongside several other writers as well as in exhibitions later in the year, with any contributors fully credited and promoted. For more information, or to email your submissions contact livingfictionbristol@gmail.com

Don’t have time to contribute? No worries – you can still get involved and discover the city of Bristol through some wonderful short works of fiction! Follow us on Twitter to find out how, and spread the word… @DoaSLiveFiction #BristolStoryTrail #WritingTheCity and keep an eye out for new stories on the Bristol Story Trail website

 

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Write Around Town Workshops in London

sonia delaunayThree weekends in which we explore how art, objects and places inspire writing.

Whether it’s for you or your characters, we’ll walk, eat and write our way around London’s art galleries. Through story fragments, sketches, and experimental writing you’ll engage with some of this spring’s major exhibitions in London.

No writing or drawing experience is necessary, but a willingness to play and experiment is. The Write Around Town workshops are devised to suit writers and artists of all levels. All participants will be included in Writers in the Crowd II, an anthology of writing in the city.

The weekends are stand-alone workshops and can be booked to suit your needs and interests. The more you book, the cheaper they get! When booking, please let us know which weekends you’d like to attend. If you have any questions, please contact us through this link or at maps@writingmaps.com

limited to 8 participants per weekend

Cost: One weekend = £105, Two weekend = £195, Three weekends = £260

cost includes entrance to exhibitions and light refreshments

For more details and to book, click here.

Weekend #1, Painting and Politics: April 24, 25, 26 (Only 3 Places Left)

Weekend #2, Images and Things: June 5, 6, 7

Weekend #3, Drawing and Daring: July 3, 4, 5

The workshops are devised and led by Shaun Levin. He has been teaching creative writing since 1997 and has run workshops and given talks at The National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Ben Uri Gallery, and the Stanley and Audrey Burton Art Gallery in Leeds. He has recently published work on the artists Mark Gertler and Isaac Rosenberg, and is the author of Seven Sweet Things and A Year of Two Summers, amongst other books. Shaun is the creator of Writing Maps.

Bunbury Magazine Issue Seven: The Unexplained

Hello, dearest Bunburyists

We’re back! Bunbury Magazine hath returnethethethed. Firstly, belated salutations of the season to you and yours! Secondly, we knew we’d find you here. We’re not being cocky or anything – we have proof.

And here is the new issue right here, just click the picture!

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There are far too many people to thank for making this issue possible but you all know who you are so give yourselves a great big pat on the back and grab yourself a pint of something you enjoy most!

So, two-thousand-and-fifteen. The year we are supposed to greet Marty McFly to the future. Have you all got your hover-boards polished and strange colander-hat-type things on? That aside, we’re hoping to have a very good year this year, like last year but even better.

In two-thousand-and-fourteen, we were absolutely astonished by the quality of the submissions we received and we want (and indeed, have for this issue) more of the same! We do not really believe in new year resolutions here but if you are going to make one, make it to send something over to us – artwork, poems, photographs, you know the drill! We love what we do and we hope you do too.

While you are about and reading some fine works, please feel free to visit our WordPress blog where our own esteemed Christopher Moriarty has set himself the challenge of writing one poem a day for the entire year. Any feedback, encouragement, criticism, jeering or loitering is extremely welcome! You can read it all here:

A Poem A Day For A Year by Christopher Moriarty

We have plans this year. Big ones. We are going to be making some very positive moves to make your Bunbury experience more shiny than it ever has been. We hope you all stay on board.

As you all know, at Bunbury it is our contributors that make the magazine as great as it is. We are not like other publications, that will give you only one issue and then leave you at the creativity turn-pike. We love it when you all get involved regularly so this is our official invitation to get involved in the next issue. The theme is ‘Power’. Dazzle us once more. Send your dazzling works to our lovely people over at submissions@bunburymagazine.com

We also survive on you lovely people sharing us on social media. So if you tweet or use Facebook, please give this issue a big shout out. Our handle is @MagazineBunbury. There is also a link below for a little readership survey which we are using to build information which could lead to some great developments in the future. Please spare a few minutes to give us your thoughts.

Readership Survey

One very, very last thing. On the 17th of February, it s our esteemed editor Keri-Ann Edwards’ birthday. To celebrate, we are hosting a live Do The Write Thing event. We have open mic spots and headline slots available so if you are free, in the area and love a good night, get yourself along. We are at Bar Ten on Silver Street, Bury, Lancs. The fun kicks off at 2000! Just click the link right above for the Facebook event page.

Well, that is probably enough rambling from us. Let’s get to the meat of it. Welcome to the first edition of Bunbury for two-thousand-and-fifteen. We hope you get the cultural fix you need.

Merry (belated) Christmas and Happy New Year,

Christopher, Keri, and Matt.

WORDS AND WOMEN’S COMPETITION WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

Lora Stimson, who studied creative writing at Norwich School of Art & Design and the UEA is the winner of this year’s Words and Women’s contemporary writing prize in the East of England.

The quality of the 170 entries was very high and there was a broad range of theme and style with women of all ages submitting prose from across the East.  Lora Stimson wins £600 for her original and quietly compelling short story, Cornflake Girl, which will feature in the second Words and Women anthology published in March this year. Lora’s story will appear alongside other highly commended selected entries and the four newly commissioned texts for ‘About,’ an Arts Council supported project which explores the relationship between women and place.

Lora has published stories and poems with Nasty Little Press, Unthank Books, Ink, Sweat and Tears and Streetcake Magazine. In 2014 she was mentored by novelist Shelley Harris as part of the WoMentoring scheme. Her first novel, about sex, grief and model villages, currently hides in a drawer. She has higher hopes for her second novel, about twins, which received an Arts Council England grant and is now in its final edit. Lora works as a programme manager for Writers’ Centre Norwich and sings with the bands Moonshine Swing Seven and The Ferries. She lives in Norwich with her husband and son.

Other prizewinners who will be published in the anthology, include Norwich-based Anna Metcalfe for The Professor, Hannah Garrard for Did You Eat Lunch? Melinda Appleby for Footprints on the Tideline, Julianne Pacheco for Kurt Cobain’s Son, Radhika Oberoi for The Reporter, as well as Patricia Mullin for The Siren and Thea Smiley who will appear twice, with her short story Magazines and her performance text, Holding Stones. A further 16 writers will also have their work included in the anthology.  For a full list of our winning writers please see our blog:  www.wordsandwomennorwich.blogspot.co.uk

The competition was judged by novelist Sarah Ridgard.

The launch of Words and Women: Two and performance of extracts from the ‘About’ Commissions’ will take place on Sunday, March 8th, on International Women’s Day at the Forum, in Norwich.

‘It has been another exciting read,’ said Belona Greenwood, co-organiser of Words and Women. ‘We had a hard time selecting our long list before handing the final responsibility for choosing the winners to this year’s judge, novelist Sarah Ridgard.  We have had a number of winning entries with some connection to the Creative Writing MA at the UEA which continues to bring new talent to Norfolk but entries have come in from all over the five counties displaying a great range of women’s voices.’

‘We judged the work anonymously and it was very exciting to find out the names of our winners at the end of this process. We have selected an outstanding mix of work, both fiction and non-fiction, and look forward to seeing it appear in Words and Women’s second anthology which will be published by Norwich based Unthank Books,’ said Lynne Bryan, Words and Women co-organiser.

Last year’s anthology was shortlisted for the national Saboteur Awards 2014. It has been praised as ’a bold and insightful collection containing much vigorous writing…’ Eastern Daily Press and ‘…a refreshing, vibrant collection that redefined the way I see women’s writing.’

Words and Women showcase women writers who live in the East of England, at all stages of their professional careers in an annual celebration of regional creativity on International Women’s Day, and through commissioning opportunities and an annual new writing prize.

See www.wordsandwomennorwich.blogspot.co.uk

 

Our Last Few Weeks and Call for Submissions

It has been a busy few weeks here at Bunbury Magazine HQ. Where to begin?!

Last month saw the Manchester Literary Festival. We headed into town and had the pleasure of catching Faber New Poets 10 at the Manchester Central Library. Each year, Faber pick a handful of promising poets and give them tutelage from established writers to help hone their craft. They each put together a collection and then tour the country presenting their stuff. The highlight for us this year was a man called Will Burns. His poetry had a touching reality to it that really drew us in. You can catch up with him here – http://www.willburns.co.uk/.

We also caught The Other Room at The Castle Hotel in Manchester. The Other Room is an event which presents experimental poetry from around the world. Our highlight at this event on the 18th October was a German poet call Ulli Freer. When he first walked onto stage he reached into a rucksack and turned on a small tape-player which filled the room with tribal chanting. He started his first poem to this chanting. Once this had finished, he wrapped his arms in bandages and launched into an epic, 15 minute poem, from memory, which was relentless, deep assault on the sense, and so wonderful. His voice carried through from the stage and beyond. If you ever get the chance to see this man – and he says he only performs about 4 times a year, we urge you to get there!

The week ended with a huge opportunity for us – a guest spot on Fab International Radio‘s literary show, ‘Page Turner‘, hosted by the wonderful Anna Percy and fantastically assisted by Pete Ford. On the show, we talked about censorship in publishing, in special relation to the book being released by MLA about his abuse as a child. With this light-hearted start, we moved on to each present a short story of our own and some pieces that have inspired us. We had plenty of good conversation and laughs about Douglas Adams, George Orwell and ended with the tale of The Giraffe in the Flat who couldn’t claim benefits. The show will be up on-line soon for you all to catch up at www.fabradiointernational.com.

A couple of weeks later, we hosted our latest event for the writing group we run, Do The Write Thing. And it was a Hallowe’en special. A true fright fest it was! Our regulars all spooked us with their offerings and we were incredibly fortunate to have the fantastic Gemma Lees as our head-liner. Gemma Also runs her own night called Once More With Meaning at the Met Bar in Bury. Check here for details.

So that’s about it. Busy busy busy but no rest for the wicked. We’re now looking forward to the next issue of Bunbury Magazine. The theme for this issue is The Unexplained. Here are our T&C‘s for submission. If you want to get involved or even just drop us a line, our email address is bunburymagazine@gmail.com

Take care, dear Bunburyists!

Bunbury Magazine Issue Six

Hey Bunburyists! 

Remember that time when we did Bunbury Magazine and it had all manner of wonderful Bunburying things in it, like poetry and art? Oh, and all the Bunburyful short stories and interviews with marvelous people? You don’t?

            That’s alright because we are back! Back with a brand new issue for you; an issue you won’t forget in an hurry. And here it is:

http://issuu.com/bunburymagazine/docs/bunbury-issue_-six

            Since we last spoke, the rarest of things occurred – we actually had a holiday! Two, in fact, because we are bourgeois. We spent a week amongst the rolling sands and omnipresent cream teas of the South Coast. Whilst there, we had the chance to visit Kents Caverns in Tourquay, which was used as the basis for Hamspley Cavern. A prize to any of you fabulous people who know in which book it features. And no google! Just send us an email.

            The second holiday was more a labour of love than a rest – the love of bringing you all the high-standard splendiforousness you see before you.

            We spent five days in Edinburgh for the Fringe Festival. Five days of running around like blue-arsed proverbials, fuelled by coffee and neeps, seeing comedy and poetry performed by some of the finest comedians and poets it has been our pleasure to encounter. The feature for this issue presents to you the very best of the Free Fringe, but we won’t give too much away right now. We will just let you immerse yourselves in what they had to say, as well as the brilliant poetry, art and stories we have for you this time round.

There are many many people to thank for this issue, both for their support and for getting involved. We will go through section by section so we do not miss anyone out!

The beautiful front cover and the artwork was provided by Katryn Beaty.

Flash fiction by Joseph Roberts and William Morris.

Life Writing by Becca Hazleden.

Our non-fiction essay was written by our wonderful resident Bunburyist Amanda Madison.

The stunning poetry was submitted by David Subacchi, Karen Little, Leanne Drain and Sarah Hussain.

Engrossing short stories by Andrew Lee-Hart, Christian Carter-Stephenson, Edward Hodgson, Katryn Beaty and Paul O’Sulliavan.

We were so pleased to present Part Four of ‘Yum Yum’ by Kurt Jarram and give you the first part of ‘Unnecessary Person’ by Isaac Swift.

We also had the pleasure of doing a book promotion for a good friend of the magazine, Stephen James.

It was our honour to give Armageddon Stereo, a brand-new wholly awesome rap-core metal band from Manchester, their first ever interview.

And, here we go, our big feature on the Edinburgh Fringe Festival included Aiden Killian, Andrew Blair, Charmain Hughes, Darren Walsh, Fay Roberts, Hannah Chutzpah, James Christopher, Laurie Bolger, Mel Jones, Nygel Harrot, Chris Chopping, Phil Cooper, Stuart Laws, Amy Acre, Ben Target, Beth Vyse, Cormac Friel, Martin Sichel of the Panda Villa HotelRichard Hartnell, Ross McCleary, Pierre Hollins and Christian Reilly.

We are also looking forward now to the next issue of Bunbury Magazine. The theme is ‘The Unexplained.’ Have you ever seen or heard something so truly out there it almost defies rationality? If you have, we would love to see your wonderful work again!

As always, you can find all our social media garb at the bottom of this email. If you aren’t already following us on Twitter or have us on the Book of Face then add us and we can tag all those who have been part of this issue and past issues as well!

And as you know, we do not charge at all for reading this beautiful magazine – that’s just not who we are. All we ask is a share on Twitter or Facebook. Just something like ‘Hey guys, check out this zine I was published in.’ or ‘About to read Bunbury Magazine because I like my eyes and want to give them pleasure.’ Or even ‘HOLY F**KB**LS! I’M F*****G N THIS F*****G MAGAZINE! THIS IS F*****G AMAAAAAAZNG! READ IT AND EXPLODE WITH JOY!’             

Ahem. So we won’t keep you any longer. Thanks for coming to see us again. We hope you enjoy your stay. Don’t be strangers now.

            Keep Bunburying!

            Christopher and Keri.

PS – there may not be a prize for the ‘Hampsley Cavern’ competition anymore. It was a cookie but we ate it!

Word Factory #23 & Masterclass – 24th May, London

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A warm welcome awaits you at Word Factory on the 24th May, a day packed with literary wonder at Waterstones Piccadilly:

Truth is Stranger than Fiction– Masterclass with Sir Peter Stothard– 1.30-4.30pm

In this two and half hour exclusive masterclass focussing on life-writing, TLS editor Sir Peter Stothard will discuss the key elements of creative memoir and its versatility, reading from his own work and from others who inspired him. He will explore the craft of editing and what you should know about editing your work. And he will lead a general workshop discussion on how to open up your life-writing. Participants may send in examples of their own life-writing in advance to cathy@thewordfactory.tv be used as part of a general discussion.

Cost: £60 per person with free entrance to the evening reading included.
Buy your tickets here.

Short Story Club – 5-6pm

This month: Hassan Blasim – The Iraqi Christ

This month, we are reading a short story from the Iraqi writer Hassan Blasim’s collection, The Iraqi Christ, about a soldier with supernatural abilities. Blasim became the first Arabic writer to be shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize earlier this year and continues to impress and shock with his surreal tales of war and terror. We will discuss themes, language and impact in the hour before the salon.

Simply email Sophie Haydock for more details and a copy of the story: sophie@thewordfactory.tv

The Word Factory #23 – the intimate short story salon – 6-8pm

Our May salon takes place in the company of in the company of four exceptional authors: Clive Sinclair will read from his latest collection, Death and Texas and William Palmer from his recently reissued collection, Four Last Things. With Sir Peter Stothard and Sheila Llewellyn, they will join Cathy Galvin in conversation about their writing lives. Book early to secure your place and a free glass of wine at Waterstones’ flagship store in Piccadilly.

Online tickets – £12 | Concessions – £8 | On the door – £15
Buy your tickets here.