Call for Submissions: Pixel Heart Literary Magazine – Issue Two

Pixel Heart Literary Magazine is currently open for submissions for its second issue. The theme is ‘Pride’, and the magazine is accepting positive LGBT+ fiction and poetry for this issue, to coincide with the theme.

Pixel Heart publishes flash fiction (under 750 words), poetry (of any length), and short stories (1,000 – 2,500 words).

There is no submission fee, and we’d love to read anything you’d like to send to us, whether you’re a new or experienced writer. In this issue we’re aiming to publish as many LGBT+ writers as possible, and, as always while all submissions are considered with care, if writers state in their submission email that they are people of colour, disabled, working class, and/or LGBT+ then their submission will be given a little extra attention.

So if you’re a writer with a positive LGBT+ story or poem, we’d love to read and consider it, so please consider submitting to us!

For our more specific submission guidelines and info on how to submit, please click here. Submissions for Issue Two are currently open until midnight BST on December 15th, 2018. ❤

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Identifying Similarities, Celebrating Differences: DNA Issue 2 out now

DNA Magazine is excited to announce that their second issue is now available to read online (completely free of charge).

The theme for this issue was identity, a topic that dominating headlines as we struggle to understand our place in the world we’re living in the face of political turmoil and polarising media headlines. At DNA, we rebel against the way huge groups of people are defined by the demographic groups they belong to. These neat boxes may appear to bring a sense of unification to the chaos of the human experience but really, they just oversimplify the glorious chaos of 8 billion unique lives. We take a brief peek into the lives of others, celebrating the things that make us similar and curiously exploring our differences.

This issue features the non-fiction work of 22 authors and poets (including Victoria Richards, Michael Carter, Helen Victoria Anderson and Michael Carter). Flick through pages of stamps with Christina Tang-Bernas as she brings a sense of order to her compulsive collection in A Eulogy in Stamps, share the anguish of sibling rivalry with Die Booth in The Cutter, risk entangling with bears in search of the serenity of a trout stream with Michael Carter in Blood Knot and finally, reflect on the role that high-profile medical cases play on our opinions about life, death and the indignity of disease in Phil Berry‘s moving essay Stigmata.

(Interested in submitting CNF prose/poetry/Twitterature to DNA? We’re now open for submissions for Issue 3: Locations. Submission information can be found here.)

Things To Do: 1. Read Issue 1 of DNA Mag 2. Submit for Issue 2

I’m delighted to announce that Issue 1 of DNA Magazine is available for your viewing pleasure! With work from 19 featured writers, each piece delves into the stories behind every day lists. Sing-a-long with Sue E. Barsby in The Family Business, crave caffeine relief with Christopher Stanley in Survivor Guilt and observe your fellow passengers with Tino Prinzi’s  The Same People At the Bus Stop! Reading these stories should definitely be on your list of things to do today.

The magazine is available to read free online but you can also order one of 50 free limited print copies of the magazine from the website (please note: we do charge a small £2.50 P&P fee national fee and £5.50 international fee). For those who like their print magazines, we’ve added a soft-touch laminate to the cover to give it a luxurious feel.

Here are some kind reviews from people who have already read the first issue:

We’re also delighted to announce that submissions are now open for Issue 2 which is due for release in September. For this issue,  we’re looking for interesting and unique insights behind identity and the multitude of things (from hobbies, relationships, schools, interests, beliefs, events or places to name but a few) which form a key part of who we are as individuals. We want to get to know you, the person you see when you look in the mirror. We want to see the places that have made an impact on your life, share in the experiences that have shaped your life.

As with the first issue, we’re looking for 300-500 word pieces of non-fiction poetry and prose – we’ll even accept prose poetry – or 144 character long pieces of Twitterature. If you have any photographs or images which could accompany the piece to help illustrate it, please also send us a copy of the file (either as a .jpg, .png or .psd). The closing date for submissions for issue 2 is Midnight on 24th July, 2017. Send them to us at submissions@dnamag.co.uk

Many thanks and we hope you enjoy Issue 1,

Katie Marsden

DNA Magazine UK Editor

Issue #2 of The Ham

We are very pleased to announce the official release of issue #2 of The Ham. The theme of this second issue is ‘Change & Stasis’.

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We have listed around a third of the total amount of printed copies for sale on our website for the small cost of £3 for a physical or £2.50 for a digital copy. We’re hoping that we might be able to make enough from selling a small number of copies online to fund the printing of future issues, and no longer have to look for outside funding to pay for the printing and distribution of The Ham.

The other two-thirds of the second issue will be distributed for free, throughout the UK, in bars, cafes, museums, galleries and public transport. For those of you unlucky enough to pick up a free copy, or for those of you feeling generous enough to buy one, you can purchase a physical or a digital copy here, as well as get a free digital copy of issue #1 if you happened to have missed it. Issue #2 is just as hefty as issue #1, with 88 pages packed full of quality short-fiction, poetry, artwork and photography, for about the price of a fancy cup of coffee. We hope you enjoy it!!

In other news, we are hoping to publish a lot more work on our website in the interim periods between the release of the physical issues of The Ham. So send us your short-fiction, poetry, artwork and photography to thehamfreepress@gmail.com and if we like it we will try our best to publish it. If we really like it, we will also try and publish it in the next physical issue of The Ham. We’re not looking for any specific themes, just quality, unique pieces of work.

Finally, we now have a mailing list! Once signed up you will receive emails every couple of weeks with new work from our contributors, and you will be the first to know when we put out the call for submissions for our print edition. To sign up just click here!

Ed (Editor)

Review of Firewords Quarterly Issue 2

firewords

Firewords Quarterly accomplishes the extraordinary feat of gathering a cacophony of original voices under one title. Each writer featured is very different from the next. This is especially impressive when you consider they have been able to piece these voices together, like some kind of literary jigsaw, into a refreshing little magazine. Even the feel of the booklet lets you know that it’s something special. Inside the magazine, the carefully plotted layouts instantly grab your attention. The illustrations (some hand-drawn some produced digitally) are as varied as the writer’s voices.

Reading Firewords is an education in the types of stories that are up-and-coming right now. Like any literary magazine its aim is to update readers on the state of current and emerging writers. Firewords achieves this with a lively mixture of short stories, flash fiction and poetry.

The short stories form the focus of the magazine, with other pieces fitted around them. There doesn’t seem to be any one uniting theme, which is part of the magazine’s charm- refusing to adhere to the current obsession with themes that many literary publications hold dear.

The two stories given the most space are: Five Seasons by Malene Huse Eikrem and The Man of Harim Province by: Peter Davison. They are both enjoyable, but I preferred the grim descriptive passages of Five Seasons; to the Murakamiesque The Man of Harim Province. The latter story is an ironic look at a bizarre ideal world, but it is quite difficult to feel a connection with. Maybe I’m just a pessimist but I preferred the outright Nordic Noir atmosphere found in Five Seasons. Five Seasons is a fascinating and piercing look at real life, though through fairly surreal glasses. However The Man of Harim Province does have some great one liners.

The other highlight of the magazine is the “Short Short Stories” section. This section does have a theme, in the form of a writing prompt (the prompt was: “As the lights went out everything changed”). The short short stories have their intensity multiplied by their brevity. The idea behind short shorts comes from the current craze for flash fiction. Flash fiction tends to borrow features from poetry, quotations and short stories. It has also been linked to twitter and other social networking sites where brevity is essential, and has become a huge part of our daily lives. In the Short Short Stories section of Firewords I especially enjoyed the story My Evil Twin by Alison Wassel. Wassel writes with a mythical slight on the modern world. Her short short is powerful enough to get her imagery stuck in your brain for several days after reading it.

Overall the design and content of Firewords Quarterly is engaging and in parts even beautiful. I look forward to the next issue, which will hopefully maintain the wide, but eclectic, range of fiction in this issue. Buy yourself a copy here.

SARAH GONNET

Sarah is a self-educated journalist, writer and artist, who creates from her shed in a northern village of the UK. Sarah has been experimenting with various forms of writing over the last few years. Recently she has been writing a lot of arts-orientated journalism for The Guardian, The Journal, Luna Luna, Sabotage Reviews, Screenjabber and essays on female artists for The Bubble. She is also working with Survivors Poetry and one of her poems was chosen as their ‘Poem of the Month’ in July. Under the pseudonym Azra Page, Sarah has published two collections of autobiographical pieces: Catharsis and Dull Eyes; Scarred Faces. Carolyn Jess Cooke published several of Sarah’s poems for her blog “On Depression”. Sarah also writes plays which are going through the development process of being performed at scratch nights.

Firewords Quarterly Issue 2 – Out now!

Firewords Issue 2

Like the long-awaited first rays of summer sun, the ‘Summer’ themed edition of Firewords Quarterly has arrived with a bang and, if we do say so ourselves, it’s a real literary and visual treat.

The call for submissions for Issue 2 was hugely successful, in both quantity and quality. In fact, we have increased the page count from 32 to 48 to accommodate as much exceptional writing as possible. As well as having much more content, we have moved away from the newsprint and embraced a perfect-bound, paperback format. This is to ensure the amazing writing and stunning artwork inside are shown to their full potential.

While implementing these changes, we have worked hard to ensure that the essence of Firewords Quarterly has remained unaltered. We pride ourselves in creating a publication that is full of powerful short fiction and poetry that is enhanced by artwork and illustrations by some amazing artistic talent. So slap on some sun cream, grab your sunglasses and feast your eyes on Issue 2.

Firewords Issue 2 - Marbles