“Dragonworld”, an evening of short stories at London’s Free Word Centre, Monday 12th December 2016

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If you love exploring the world, storytelling and books, join us on our next fictional journey that’s just as rewarding as the real thing. Whether you’re a London local or new to the city, come and connect with others who want to see the world with fresh eyes and open minds.

Free Word Centre, and Paper-Republic.org translators , are running a speedbookclubbing evening at Free Word Centre, 60 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3GA, Monday 12th December 2016. We’ll be presenting four short stories translated from Chinese. Sign up, read the stories in advance (or read the Cheat Sheet, if you don’t have time to read them all) and come along for some brilliant discussion.


“Dragonworld”: In these tales of death, desire, and despair, a police officer investigating a brutal murder interrogates his chief suspect, but the details of the crime itself are constantly shifting. A woman hopes a knight in shining armour will offer her an escape from the road she seems destined to pace forever. A dispute between two witnesses to a killing results in a fatal duel. A teenage gamer must find a way to deal with the concrete-hungry dragons that are somehow taking over his town.

Here’s the link: https://www.freewordcentre.com/whats-on/dragonworld-china?spektrix_bounce=true. Do come if you can. The last time we ran a speedbookclubbing event, it was a big success, a sell-out in fact.

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The Literary Consultancy Self-editing workshop: Short Story

Following the success of their recent Editing-related events The Literary Consultancy (TLC) will be running a short story self-editing workshop aimed at writers in November 2016. The workshop will run over two hours, with places strictly limited to 15 writers in each workshop. The workshop will provide practical guidance for writers wanting to develop their self-editing skills ahead of submission to an editorial service, or to an agent or publisher, and for those simply working on projects and wanting help with approaching the work objectively and afresh. It will look at the basic principles of short stories, with some practical examples, in order to form the basis for your self-editing. Narrative structure, characterisation, and voice are key, and this workshop will show you how to interrogate these principles when editing your story, to ensure it makes the impact the chosen subject demands.

The short story workshop will take place on 17th November 2016 with novelist and Peepal Tree Press Associate Editor Jacob Ross. Jacob will take writers through practical exercises and provide guidance on best practice in self-editing your own work.

 

This workshop will have a limited number of bursaried places, including travel costs (from outside of London), available for writers or aspiring editors on low income. Proof of income will be required as part of the application process for these tickets. To apply for a bursary, please email Aki Schilz on aki@literaryconsultancy.co.uk, including a short covering letter explaining your reasons for applying. Please also provide any proof of income as an email attachment and mark the email ‘TLC Self-Editing Workshop Bursary CONFIDENTIAL’, with the genre clearly indicated.

 

The event will be held at the Free Word Centre, Farringdon – and further ticket information and booking details can be found here: https://www.freewordcentre.com/whats-on/tlc-self-editing-ss

Edge Hill Prize 2014 Open For Submissions

Hard to believe that we’re now into the eighth year of the Edge Hill Prize. The idea came up after a one day conference I organised for short story writers and critics back in 2006. We wanted to help raise the status of the form, encouraging British publishers to accept and promote single author collections. After all this time, the Edge Hill Prize is still unique in the UK. Since we began, several major new short story awards have run alongside the National Short Story Prize  – for instance the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award and the Costa Prize – but they all recognize a stand-alone story. The Frank O’Connor Award is a much bigger prize than ours, and an inspiration, but its shortlist tends to be dominated by American authors. The Edge Hill Prize awards £5000 to an author born or based in the British Isles, including Ireland, for a collection published in the previous year, with an additional £1000 Readers’ Choice prize, currently judged by BA Creative Writing students at Edge Hill. Winners so far have been Colm Tóibín, Claire Keegan, Chris Beckett, Jeremy Dyson, Graham Mort, Sarah Hall and Kevin Barry.

The deadline for entries is the first week in March. At this stage of the yearly cycle, the parcels are gradually arriving from the publishers – first, as always, the small presses, with entries from Welsh and Irish authors already looking strong. Later in March we’ll announce a longlist, narrowing that down to a shortlist of five by early May. Shortlisting is carried out by staff and postgraduates, in consultation with the three main judges. It’s a difficult and painstaking process; there can be no simple tick-box procedure. Broadly speaking, we’re looking for something that compels us to read on, something exciting in the language, and something that fully exploits the short story form. There are many gifted writers who don’t quite make the shortlist.  One or two of their stories may be outstanding, but they haven’t maintained that high standard across the whole collection. Other collections are too limited in style or subject matter, so that you feel that each story is a variation of the one that came before.

Last year the shortlisting process was made even more difficult by a record-breaking longlist. Bloomsbury had named 2012 ‘the year of the short story’, and other publishers, both independent and mainstream, seemed to share that sentiment. Even extending the shortlist to six (Kevin Barry, Emma Donoghue, Jon McGregor, Adam Marek, Jane Rogers, Lucy Wood) meant excluding some authors who in another year might have been finalists. As Graham Mort said, accepting the prize 2011, ‘literary prizes were never intended to provoke competition alone, but to celebrate diversity, quality and commitment’. The seven shortlists so far have been an inventory of the most exciting writing in the British Isles, including work by Jackie Kay, Helen Simpson, Anne Enright, A.L. Kennedy, Robert Shearman and many others.

The 2014 judging panel includes last year’s winner, Kevin Barry, Katie Allen of welovethisbook.com and Carys Bray who was the first winner of a third award category, presented for a story by a current MA Creative Writing student at Edge Hill. Her collection, Sweet Home, was subsequently published by Salt to great acclaim. With Carys on the panel, the prize has come full circle, completing the inextricable links between short story writing and reading, which turn emerging talents into established authors.

The award ceremony this year will be on 3rd July at the Free Word Centre in London. I have no idea who will be on the shortlist this year, let alone who the winner will be.

The judges’ discussions have always been spirited and amicable, fuelled by enthusiasm for the short story form, and the decisions have been difficult but always unanimous. None of us know exactly what we’re looking for, but we always recognize it when we see it.

To see terms and conditions and how to enter the competition, go to Edge Hill Prize