Issue 8 and a New Press, Perhaps

Issue 8 coverWe’ve been thinking that it could be fun to set up a small press. The A3 Press. Same kind of format as The A3 Review and Writing Maps, a place for writers and artists to publish short work. We’re imagining these beautifully designed chapbooks that fold out. Let us know what you think! If you click here, you’ll be taken to the survey.

We’re almost ready to start compiling Issue 8, The Gold Issue. This month is the last opportunity to be included in our next issue. The theme is brief encounters and the deadline is Saturday, 24th February. Quickies, chance meetings, a brief exchange that changes a life. Click here for all the details and some further suggestions. You can also pre-order a copy of Issue 8 here.

For all our future contest themes, check out our Submittable page.

Happy Writing!

Deadline Day is Coming! London Independent Story Prize

Just a few days left until the Deadline! 10th of January!

Polish those 300-word short-short stories and take your chance. Become a part of this wonderful community of writers and storytellers. Take the chance of winning the prize! Give your story a chance to be recognised.

Check out the 2018 Calendar from here LISP.

LISP judges are looking for strong and unique voices, check out the interviews with the judges on the website.

‘Originality must come from other resources: from one’s own voice, personality, character.’ Luis Pizarro, LISP judge.

‘Given that the story can only be 300 words, I am looking for something beyond the ephemeral, a story that will make an impression.’ James Kirchick, LISP judge.

‘LISP is based on creating a great community and, of course, all the writers who attend the competition will definitely be a part of this network. However, winners are winners, and they will have the greatest advantage. First of all, the prize and publication, and when you win a competition, it means that your pen has been recognised, which is a great feature for any writer. Not only while trying to reach agents or publishers, but also the personal satisfaction is priceless. Especially for young writers, it’s a way to build confidence.

As an award winner, I can also say that it helps you to improve. Now you see that you can write things that others appreciate as well, which encourages you to be even bolder.’ Ozge Gozturk, LISP founder.

Flash Fiction Competition, London Independent Story Prize

London Independent Story Prize, LISP is holding a writing contest. Their aim is to discover extraordinary artistic approaches to story writing, stories that embrace the diversity of gender and culture whilst being brave and passionate. They are looking for unique and strong voices. BAME, Women, and LGBTQ are especially welcome. They’ll be delighted to read it and you could be in with a chance to win!

Entries can be sent through their website www.londonindependentstoryprize.co.uk

Follow their Facebook and Twitter @LIStoryPrize for the announcements.

Early Bird Deadline: 1st of January 2018

Submissions Close on 10th of January

Winner announcements, on 10th of February

Prizes: £100 First, £30 Second, £10 Third

Check their amazing judge list from this link.LISP-5

Don’t Betray Your Calling!

One of the fun aspects of putting together The A3 Review is coming up with the themes and prompts for each month’s contest. This month’s theme is particularly rich. One of those themes that you really need an entire novel to tackle, and we’re inviting you to do it in no more than 150 words! Betrayal. In 12-and-a-half dozen words or less. Do not betray your risk-taking disposition as a writer and an artist! This month’s theme is for you.

We’re looking for stories, poems and artwork that are political, personal or both. Secret betrayals and double crossings. From the banal to the Biblical. Write the Samson story from Delilah’s POV, for example. Or: What would Judas say? Write a poem about feeling betrayed by someone’s Tinder profile. He, or she, is definitely not as cute in real life!

Find inspiration in the words associated with betrayal: back-stabbing, double-dealing, disloyalty, treachery and duplicity.

Or tell the story of the first time you betrayed someone. What happened and where is that person today? Put into words what it feels like to be betrayed. Or what it tastes like, smells like. Write a poem of rage or forgiveness. Possible opening phrases could be: “We knew we’d been betrayed when…” or “This is how I betrayed him…” or “Just before she did it she…” or “It wasn’t the first time that…”

Click here for more prompts, suggestions, and details about how to enter this month’s contest. Deadline is the 28th of October. There’s also info here about the next few contests. If you think “Betrayal” is a juicy one, then there’s “Losing It” and “Brief Encounters” coming up, too.

When you enter our contests, don’t forget our popular (and very affordable) Brief Critique option. For just $15 we provide a line edit of your submission, along with 250 words of feedback on ways to take your work to the next level. Tick the Brief Critique add-on, and you’ll be able to pay together with your entry fee. Critiques are provided once the month’s winning entries have been announced.

We hope you’ll enjoy this month’s theme.

Spelk: Open for Submissions

Spelk is open for submissions.

Our current reading period is February 14 to March 12.

We will let you know by mid-March if your story has been accepted.

Submission guidelines: http://spelkfiction.com/submit-2/

Please keep the following in mind if you’d like to send us something:

  • We publish flash fiction — 500 words, give or take.
  • We’ll consider just about any genre: we’re not fussy if it’s “literary” or “non-literary.” If we like it, we’ll publish it.
  • We don’t publish poetry or non-fiction.
  • We post three stories a week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
  • We want previously unpublished stories. If you’ve got something good, we want it to appear on Spelk first.
  • We accept simultaneous submissions, but let us know if you place your story somewhere else.
  • We don’t accept multiple submissions, so just one story at a time please.
  • We don’t pay. Sorry.
  • You retain all rights to your story, but we’d like to archive it on our site.
  • Spell-check your story before you send it. Proof it. Make sure it’s the best you can make it.
  • Send us a Word document and include a short bio at the end of your story. Let us know if you’re on Facebook or Twitter, or if you have your own website.
  • Email your story to Gary Duncan at spelkfiction@gmx.com (subject line: SUBMISSIONS — “STORY TITLE”).

The Leaders and Followers Contest

the-a3-review-6Happy New Year from The A3 Review. We’re here to help you make it a creative one!

Because we have a feeling it’s going to be that kind of year, we’re looking for writing and artwork on the theme of Leaders and Followers. We want pieces sparked by the idea of leaders, followers and/or the dynamic between the two. Use the theme as a catalyst for some creative ideas.

Think about blind loyalty and betrayal. Explore the complex emotions and interactions: obedience, humility, charisma, authority, cruelty. Or be inspired by the natural world: ducklings following their mother, bees attending their queen, herds of animals or flocks of birds following their dominant leader. Write about the point when a new leader usurps the old one. Or think about work environments, sports teams, religion, the battlefield, cults or clans.

Write about fictional situations or your own experiences of any of the above.

Start with “She was the leader of…” or “We had no choice but to follow him…” or “I finally became the leader when…” Write about a follower who wants to be a leader by making a list of all the things they’d do to get what they want? Write about the burden of leadership, a tired dictator, a cult leader who’s lost their faith, or that person who’ll go to any length to get more Twitter followers!

Deadline is 28 January. For more details visit our Submittable page.

Each month we choose two winning pieces for publication (The A3 Review is published twice a year, and the next issue comes out in April 2017). All winning entries receive Writing Maps and contributor copies, while three overall winners for each issue receive cash prizes.

Good luck and keep writing!

March Fortnightly Round-Up II

Dear short story lovers,
Here’s what’s been happening on our blog over the past fortnight or so…

Tania x

Lit Mags

Trafika Europe has published Issue 3, Latvian Sojourn, and Don’t Do It Issue 8, Noise, is now live. Flash: The Short Short Story magazine has launched issue 7.2. Trafika Europe also invites you to visit their radio campaign!

Jotters United celebrates its first birthday with a call for submissions for its anniversary issue. Octavius magazine has relaunched – and is now open to submissions. Shooter Literary Magazine is calling for submissions for Issue #2, on the theme of ‘Union’, by April 1st. Neon Magazine has opened submissions for Battery Pack II, its second anthology of tiny stories, deadline April 15.

Competitions & Festivals
The Felixtstowe Book Festival’s 2015 short story competition is accepting entries until May 16th, and The Moth’s International Short Story Prize is open, deadline June 30th. Holland Park Press is running a short story competition, I Is Another, deadline 31 August.

Workshops and Courses
Write Around Town, who are behind Writing Maps, are holding a series of writing workshops in London in April.

Live Lit
The Word Factory #31 and masterclass is on March 28th in London. Fictions Of Every Kind’s next event, with the theme of ‘Relativity’ is on April 14th in Leeds.

Last Minutes and Gentle Reminders
The deadline for Mslexia’s 2015 short story competition (women only) has been extended to March 23rd. Submissions are open til March 31st for The Manchester Review  and Brain Of Forgetting’s 2nd issue, on the theme of ‘Poppies’.  The Short FICTION short story prize closes on March 31st.

If you are eager for even more short-story-related news, do follow ShortStops on Twitter where, when we should be writing, we spend (far too) much time passing on news from lit mags, live lit events, short story workshops and festivals! If you’d like to review an event or a publication, drop me a line.

Happy reading, writing, listening and performing!
Tania x

Out Now – Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, 7.2 (October 2014)

Issue 7.2 of Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine is now available.

It features new stories from Australia, Austria, Britain, Canada, China, Germany, India, Ireland, Japan, and the USA. We are particularly pleased to open with pieces by two distinguished European writers, in luminous translations: two ‘zkv’s (‘zeer korte verhalen’ [very short stories]) by A. L. Snijders, who coined the term, translated from the Dutch by Man Booker International winner Lydia Davis; and three pieces from Austrian writer Josef Winkler’s When the Time Comes (2013), translated by Adrian West, originally published in German as Wenn es soweit ist – Erzählung (1998). Wonderful renderings by West of Winkler also appeared in Flash, 6.1. Davis’s impressive Collected Stories (2009) was featured in the ‘Flash Presents’ section of 6.2; her latest collection, Can’t and Won’t, is enthusiastically reviewed in this issue by Robert Shapard, editor of influential flash and sudden-fiction anthologies.

This issue’s ‘Flash Presents’ contains four stories by Virginia Woolf: ‘A Haunted House’, ‘Monday or Tuesday’, ‘Blue & Green’, and ‘In the Orchard’. These are followed by our fourth ‘Flash Essay’. In ‘“Splinters & mosaics”: Virginia Woolf’s Flash Fictions’, Kathryn Simpson argues that Woolf’s experimental flashes provide insight into her emergence as a major modernist novelist and her enduring preoccupations.

Flash Reviews’ examines two other single-author books and two anthologies. Laurie Champion is entertained by Lucy Corin’s One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses, a collection of short and short-short stories, while Christine Simon is intrigued by Will Eaves’s The Absent Therapist, a novel in flashes. Robert Scotellaro enjoys Tara Laskowski’s selection from ten years of the SmokeLong Quarterly, while Ian Seed embraces the longer perspective of Alan Ziegler’s Short, which ranges over five centuries of brief prose. Each review is accompanied by a sample story. Laskowski’s anthology is represented by Jeff Landon’s ‘Five Fat Men in a Hot Tub’, Ziegler’s by Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Artist’.

To order a copy of the issue, or to subscribe to the magazine, go to: http://www.chester.ac.uk/flash.magazine

Peter Blair and Ashley Chantler (Editors)

Out Now: Issue 6.2 of Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine

Issue 6.2 of Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine is now available.

Contributors include: Lydia Davis, Ihab Hassan, Nuala Ni Chonchuir, Ian Seed, and Shellie Zacharia. Jane Hertenstein contributes the flash essay ‘The Mystery of Memory; or How to Write Memoir-ish’. And there are reviews of collections by Dan Rhodes, David Gaffney, Dan Rhodes, and Peter Cherches.

For further information and to order a copy, go to: http://www.chester.ac.uk/flash.magazine

Flash 6.2 Front Cover