Northern Lights Writers Conference 2019 – tickets available now

Creative Industries Trafford (CIT) is running its popular Northern Lights Writers’ Conference for a sixth year, at Waterside in Sale, a short hop by tram, bus, car and bike from Manchester city centre.

Northern Lights Writers Conference 2019

Northern Lights Writers Conference 2019

The day-long event for emerging and established writers includes one-to-one advice sessions on writing, editing and submitting short stories, poetry and creative non-fiction; workshops on creating scripts for TV and collaborating on graphic novels; talks and panel discussions on funding, training and development opportunities for writers, pathways to publication, and diversity in the publishing industry; networking possibilities and book signings, plus a keynote speech and ‘in conversation’ session looking at different genres, platforms and adaptations by bestselling author Jane Rogers.

Saturday 21 September, 11am–5pm (registration from 10.30am), Waterside, Sale, £35 (£25 concessions). Book online or call 0161 912 5616. More here.

BlueHouse Journal Issue #1: submission deadline AUGUST 1ST

BlueHouse is putting together our first issue, and we are still looking for work by emerging and established writers that frame the “I voice” in a new and exciting way! We love poetry, concrete poetry, lyric essay, creative non-fiction, flash and micro fiction and so much more!

Any questions? Please contact us.

Interested in submitting? Check out our submission guidelines.

For the latest from BlueHouse, please visit our website, or follow us on twitter.

Happy writing!

-The Editors

 

Shooter seeks submissions for Identity issue

Shooter Literary Magazine has opened submissions for its summer issue (#10), which will be Identity.

The biannual lit mag (recently reviewed in the TLS) wants stories, essays, reported narratives and poetry on anything to do with the sense of self, whether personal or cultural. What defines someone – character, actions, associations, appearance? Why is identity important? What happens when it’s threatened? Shooter particularly seeks content that addresses topical issues of gender, sexuality, race, nationality, religion and occupation, but the theme is open to wide interpretation.

For anyone with stories outside that theme (and keen to reap a rather larger cash reward), Shooter’s 2019 Short Story Competition is also open for entries. The winner will collect a £500 prize, with publication online and in the summer issue, while the runner-up receives £100 and online publication.

Deadline for both general and competition submissions is April 21st. Please visit Shooter’s Submissions or Competition pages for guidelines on how to submit.

Free Membership @JerichoWriters – LISP 4th Quarter 2018 News!

Writers! We have great news.

The London Independent Story Prize 4th Quarter Deadline is on 12th November 2018.  And beside the £200 cash prize, our winner will also receive One-Year Membership from Jericho Writers, which is worth £195.00!

LISP is accepting 300 Word Flash Fiction stories NOW! Deadline is coming, so hurry up.

Don’t miss the great prizes!

Jericho Writers is a club for writers, created by writers. They organise wonderful courses, webinars, one-to-one agent meetings, and great events that you can extend your network.

Simply, Jericho Writers is helping writers to get published.

Click to read the success stories!

Could you be next?

Please click the link to find out more about this wonderful platform!

AND CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR STORY !!

Shooter seeks submissions for “Rivalry”

Shooter Literary Magazine invites submissions of short fiction, non-fiction and poetry on the theme of “Rivalry” for its winter 2018 issue.

Writers should submit stories, essays, memoir, reported narratives and poetry on anything to do with competition, antagonism, warring forces and individual foes. The context might be sports, business, romance, politics, survival; the characters might be students, frenemies, parents, current and former lovers, courtroom opponents. As ever, the theme is open to wide interpretation.

Please visit https://shooterlitmag.com/submissions for guidelines; deadline is November 11th, 2018. Successful writers will hear from us within a few weeks of the deadline, if not before, and receive payment and a copy of the issue following publication. Due to the volume of submissions we no longer send rejection emails.

The 2018 Shooter Poetry Competition is also now open, with a discounted three-poem entry fee. Find guidelines for entering the competition at https://shooterlitmag.com/poetry-competition.

rhaw Magazine is open for submissions!

rhaw Magazine is now open for submissions all-year-round and we are looking for contributions to our second issue! As before, submission is free and we accept all forms of work except audio and visual pieces, including creative non-fiction, essays, all kinds of visual art, experimental writing, etc.

We now split the year into two reading periods. For our May ’19 issue, our reading period begins 1st January, so get your work into us before then! If you miss the date, don’t worry, we will consider your work for the next issue.

For full details on our submission process and guidelines, click here.

Good luck and we look forward to seeing your work!

Best,

The rhaw Magazine Team

Shooter seeks “Dirty Money” for issue #8

Shooter Literary Magazine invites submissions of short fiction, non-fiction and poetry on the theme of “Dirty Money” for its summer 2018 issue.

Writers should submit stories, essays, reported narratives and poetry on anything to do with dough, whether rolling in it or scrounging for it. We want to read about playboys and girls, corrupt bankers, hard-up students, entrepreneurs, gamblers, thieves, grafters – anyone affected by money in any compelling way. Are riches really the root of all evil, or the key to the world’s delights?

Please visit https://shooterlitmag.com/submissions for guidelines; deadline is April 8th, 2018. Successful writers will hear from us within a few weeks of the deadline, if not before, and receive payment and a copy of the issue. Due to the volume of submissions we no longer send rejection emails.

The 2018 Shooter Short Story Competition is also now open, with a newly reduced entry fee for those wishing to submit more than one story. Find guidelines for entering the competition at https://shooterlitmag.com/competition.

 

Call for Submissions: HCE’s Tomorrow Issue

The editors at Here Come Everyone magazine (HCE) are seeking submissions for our upcoming Tomorrow Issue. We’re a quarterly literary magazine of short fiction, poetry, articles and artwork based around topical and interesting themes. We aim to provide an open and accessible platform for readers and contributors.

 

The new theme: ‘TOMORROW’ (future/technology/space/other worlds/science etc.)

Deadline: 1st March 2018

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We encourage bold/striking interpretations of the theme. If your link to ‘tomorrow’ isn’t self-evident, we advise you to include a few lines in your author bio to provide context.

 

POETRY: you may submit up to three poems of no longer than 30 lines each.

FICTION: please submit only one piece per issue; stories may be up to 2,000 words.

NON-FICTION: please submit only one piece per issue; articles may be up to 1,500 words.

ARTWORK: you may submit up to three pieces; we accept all visual media (300 dpi and 640 x 640 res)

 

Please see our submissions guidelines for full details. Work must be sent via the form on our website; stuff we receive via email will not be accepted. Any Word or .docX format is fine, but no PDFs. For submissions of artwork, please ensure your files are of sufficient image size and hi-res, otherwise they cannot be used.

We look forward to receiving your creations…

 

 

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To get an idea of what HCE is looking for, you can check out our brand new Brutal Issue – now available for purchase from our shop! Full of short stories and flash fiction, plus art, poetry and other writing.

Deadline Day is Coming! London Independent Story Prize

Just a few days left until the Deadline! 10th of January!

Polish those 300-word short-short stories and take your chance. Become a part of this wonderful community of writers and storytellers. Take the chance of winning the prize! Give your story a chance to be recognised.

Check out the 2018 Calendar from here LISP.

LISP judges are looking for strong and unique voices, check out the interviews with the judges on the website.

‘Originality must come from other resources: from one’s own voice, personality, character.’ Luis Pizarro, LISP judge.

‘Given that the story can only be 300 words, I am looking for something beyond the ephemeral, a story that will make an impression.’ James Kirchick, LISP judge.

‘LISP is based on creating a great community and, of course, all the writers who attend the competition will definitely be a part of this network. However, winners are winners, and they will have the greatest advantage. First of all, the prize and publication, and when you win a competition, it means that your pen has been recognised, which is a great feature for any writer. Not only while trying to reach agents or publishers, but also the personal satisfaction is priceless. Especially for young writers, it’s a way to build confidence.

As an award winner, I can also say that it helps you to improve. Now you see that you can write things that others appreciate as well, which encourages you to be even bolder.’ Ozge Gozturk, LISP founder.

Countdown To Deadline – Polish That Prose

WORDS AND WOMEN ANNUAL NEW WRITING COMPETITION – GET YOUR ENTRIES IN!

Deadline Midnight, 15th November 2017

Win the national prize for women over 40 of £1,000 and a month’s writing residency provided by Hosking Houses Trust and a regional prize (East of England) of £600 and a mentoring session with Jill Dawson of Gold Dust.Poster 2017 Online low res

Winning entries will be published online and in a Compendium of Words and Women’s best entries from the last 4 prize-winning anthologies.

Entries can be fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction and life-writing on any theme.

2,200 words

Guest judges: Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney, authors of A Secret Sisterhood: The hidden friendship of Austen, Bronte, Eliot and Woolf. 

National prize open to women writers over the age of 40. Regional prize open to women writers over the age of 16 living or working in the East of England.

For more details email wordsandwomencomp@gmail.com or visit our blog at www.wordsandwomennorwich.blogspot.co.uk

Identifying Similarities, Celebrating Differences: DNA Issue 2 out now

DNA Magazine is excited to announce that their second issue is now available to read online (completely free of charge).

The theme for this issue was identity, a topic that dominating headlines as we struggle to understand our place in the world we’re living in the face of political turmoil and polarising media headlines. At DNA, we rebel against the way huge groups of people are defined by the demographic groups they belong to. These neat boxes may appear to bring a sense of unification to the chaos of the human experience but really, they just oversimplify the glorious chaos of 8 billion unique lives. We take a brief peek into the lives of others, celebrating the things that make us similar and curiously exploring our differences.

This issue features the non-fiction work of 22 authors and poets (including Victoria Richards, Michael Carter, Helen Victoria Anderson and Michael Carter). Flick through pages of stamps with Christina Tang-Bernas as she brings a sense of order to her compulsive collection in A Eulogy in Stamps, share the anguish of sibling rivalry with Die Booth in The Cutter, risk entangling with bears in search of the serenity of a trout stream with Michael Carter in Blood Knot and finally, reflect on the role that high-profile medical cases play on our opinions about life, death and the indignity of disease in Phil Berry‘s moving essay Stigmata.

(Interested in submitting CNF prose/poetry/Twitterature to DNA? We’re now open for submissions for Issue 3: Locations. Submission information can be found here.)

London Lit Lab: Write and Edit a Story in a Weekend 7-8 Oct

We had so much fun teaching Write and Edit a Story in the spring that we’ve brought it back again this autumn. Only this time we’re not only dissecting the short story, but also the personal essay.

We all have different strengths and weaknesses as writers. For some, getting a first draft down is a necessary torture before the fun of editing begins. For others, editing is the agony after the ecstasy!

This two-day course is designed to get you both writing and editing, by combining dedicated creative time with an intensive tour through ways to improve your craft.

On day one, we’ll kick off by exploring ways to turn our ideas into full stories, whether we’re writing fiction or creative nonfiction, from getting first words down to finishing a draft. You will then have ample time and space (and tea and cake) to write, in the quiet company of fellow scribblers.

On day two, we will work through a series of editing approaches, which you will be able to apply to your own work. Think of these as a series of editorial experiments that will throw new light on plot, style, characterisation, setting, dialogue, openings and endings. We suggest that you bring your draft from the previous day (or another story or essay if you prefer), in multiple copy or on a laptop, so that you can test out approaches even if you choose not to apply all the editing techniques we teach in the session. We’ll discuss the results and share our work if we wish. In the spring both Zoe and Lily shared a very rough draft of their own writing, to be pulled apart by the group, but it was a great learning curve for everyone. So we’ll most likely do this again as well. Eek!

You don’t have to come up with an idea on the spot. You might have an idea you’ve been wanting to write, or a piece you have already started. Please bring this with you, to draft on day one. For those who want a new idea, we’ll provide optional idea-generating material to get you going.

This course is suitable for both beginners and committed writers. For both those writing fiction and creative nonfiction. Whether you’re dabbling in your first short stories or personal essays, or you’re compiling a short story collection, or writing a memoir, we welcome you. By the end of the course we’ll endeavour to help you have a new draft of a story or essay, and a range of editing skills to help get it into shape.

Course fee: Early Bird £189. Full fee £229

Date and Time: Weekend of October 7th & 8th, 10am-4pm

Location: Clapton Laundry, London – a luxurious, inspiring space in East London, where you will have plenty of space to spread out and find a quiet spot during the first day of writing. Lunch will also be provided

Tutors: This course will be taught by both Lily Dunn and Zoe Gilbert of London Lit Lab. By leading workshops together, we are able to bring two perspectives to everything we teach, and therefore everything is up for discussion! Sharing our differing approaches to writing helps to create a richer learning experience, which we believe benefits everyone who comes on our courses.

Places are limited, so if you would like to reserve a place, or for more information, please get in touch at info@londonlitlab.co.uk

We have one place on this course available at a 75% discount for a writer who would struggle to pay the full fee. If you, or someone you know, would like to apply for this place, please write to us at info@londonlitlab.co.uk, by 23rd September. In no more than 200 words, please tell us why you would like to come on the course, what you write, and why a discounted place would be valuable to you. We won’t be fact-checking but we really want to give this place to someone who genuinely needs it, so please be honest. Thanks, and we look forward to hearing from you.

http://www.londonlitlab.co.uk/

Submissions open for Shooter’s “New Life” issue

Submissions have reopened for Shooter Literary Magazine‘s issue #7 with the theme of “New Life”.

As always, the theme is open to interpretation. In addition to the subject of birth, writers might like to consider themes to do with renewal, invention and reinvention. “New Life” could conjure starting over later in life; giving someone a chance at a critical time; rescuing animals or people, perhaps through adoption; second chances and opportunities that radically change someone’s circumstances. Non-fiction to do with trying to get pregnant, birth or parenting (from either a personal or political perspective) is particularly welcome. Poetry should incline to the observational rather than experimental end of the spectrum.

Literary fiction, creative non-fiction and narrative journalism should fall between 2,000 and 7,500 words. Please submit only one story or up to three poems per issue. Simultaneous submissions are welcome but let us know if your work is accepted elsewhere. All work must be previously unpublished either in print or online. Successful writers receive payment and a copy of the issue.

Please read the guidelines at Shooter’s Submissions page before sending your work. The deadline for issue #7, which comes out this winter, is November 5th.

In addition to general submissions to the magazine, poets might like to submit verse on any theme to Shooter’s 2017 Poetry Competition. Further details can be found at https://shooterlitmag.com/poetry-competition.

Chroma Magazine: Call for Submissions

Chroma Magazine is looking for articles/creative essays and short stories.

Our first issue is based around the colour red. This can be interpreted in many different ways. We are looking for writing that focuses on- war, communism, meat, blood, anger, sexuality, gender, mind and body, colour, poisonous animals, foxes, bulls, the devil, and wine. But of course, we are always open to other suggestions.

WHAT WE DON’T WANT IS JUST A SUMMARY OF WHAT RED MEANS TO YOU.

If you are a thinker, philosopher, journalist or have any interest in writing for us, please get in contact.

We are looking for pieces around 500-1500 words long. 

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 30TH APRIL

contact us at:
editor@chromamagazine.com

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – The Real Story – Creative Nonfiction

The Real Story is an Arts Council funded writing organisation devoted to developing creative nonfiction in the UK.

In our online journal, we publish original nonfiction short stories, including personal essays, lyric essays, reportage, narrative journalism and short memoirs of under 3,000 words.

Submissions are free and accepted on a rolling basis (simultaneous submissions ok), accepted pieces will be edited for publication.

See guidelines and submit here: https://therealstory.submittable.com/submit  

Submissions open for Shooter #4: Technology

Staring into screens all day as so many of us now do, it’s not surprising to end up contemplating the extent to which fast-evolving technologies improve our lives – or deaden us to reality.

Given the impact that cutting-edge technology will continue to have on our lives – whether in the fields of medicine, agriculture, energy, warfare, entertainment, love or pretty much any area of human life – it seems that this is a crucial theme for writers to contemplate. Scientific advances may keep people alive for longer; but what will be the quality of life? Industry has polluted the earth to levels that ultimately may threaten our survival; will environmental innovation develop in time to combat the effects of climate change? The global population continues to mushroom; how will we manage to feed the planet? The latest dating apps arguably encourage grass-is-greener syndrome and an expedient attitude towards sex and romance; in light of this, how will people build loving relationships and stable families?

With so many significant issues swirling around technology, Shooter Literary Magazine invites submissions of short fiction, non-fiction and poetry on that theme for its summer issue. The magazine will favour pieces that grapple with the effect of real technologies (either those already in existence or currently being developed) over imaginary technologies of futuristic science-fiction. Fantastical sci-fi will be considered, but must either be related to a current technology or be of an exceptionally high literary standard. Whether in the form of a gadget, digital app, scientific development or cutting-edge process, technology can form either a small or large part of the story or poem, but in all cases work should address the impact that technology has on human experience, interaction or way of life.

As always, Shooter places a high value on entertaining, emotionally engaging stories that feature elegant writing and compelling characters. Irrespective of genre, writing must be of a high literary standard. Poetry that inclines to the observational, rather than experimental, end of the spectrum is preferred. Non-fiction can take the form of an opinion essay, personal memoir or reported piece of narrative journalism; non-fiction writers may query Melanie White at editor.shooterlitmag@gmail.com if they wish to run an idea past her first.

Prose writers may submit one story of 2,000 to 7,500 words, while poets may submit up to three poems by the deadline of April 24th. Shooter also seeks original illustrations for the cover; artists should send samples of their work or a link to their portfolio to artwork.shooterlitmag@gmail.com. Shooter pays writers and artists for their contributions. For submission guidelines and further details, please visit www.shooterlitmag.com/submissions.

Speak Easy 2016… and Tips for Spoken Word First-Timers

SE_PNGA new year, a fresh new look for Speak Easy at The Sip Club in Stretford, Manchester. After a successful first three events in Autumn last year, we’ve gathered our gorged selves and turned to the giddy horizon of 2016 with a bold new poster and a fresh outlook. We’re excited to see how Speak Easy will develop over the next twelve months and we’re starting to formulate some rather thrilling plans behind the scenes.

But first we need readers. We ain’t gonna survive if no-one turns up to read. So pick up, buck up, and sign up: send an email to events@thesipclub.co.uk to bag yourself a slot at one (or indeed more) of our first three 2016 events. Here be the dates:

  • Thursday 14th January
  • Thursday 4th February
  • Thursday 3rd March

As ever, we are especially keen to encourage first timers to the Speak Easy stage. We’re lucky to have a particularly stress-free environment and a delightfully welcoming audience, perfect to calm even the nerviest of nerves. No pressure, no heckling – not even a microphone to make your voice sound all big and scary. Just a quiet room with some warm people and a little nudge of gentle encouragement.

And in the spirit of encouragement, here are my top 5 tips for Spoken Word first-timers:

  1. Slow Down – relax, take your time, tell the story. Read slower than you think you should. Allow time to let people laugh at the funny bits and reflect on the sad bits. Don’t worry about going over time because…
  2. Practice Beforehand – …you will have already practiced. In most cases you’ll know how long you have on stage (usually around 5 minutes), so time yourself so you know you’re hitting the mark. Also, its good to let your mouth get around the words as well as your eyes – so practice out loud!
  3. Look at the Audience – this is often a big fear but looking at the audience can genuinely help you to calm down and it will draw them in. You will get them on-side. You will dominate them, command them, make them tremble at your 5 minutes of glory. So don’t hide behind your paper, don’t look over their heads. Look at them. Into. Their. Eyes
  4. Print your Words Big – do your future self a favour and make the text big. You never know how dimly lit a stage will be and not being able to see the words can derail your momentum at any given moment.
  5. Perform it – Spoken Word is just another form of theatre. Don’t be afraid to get your whole body into the act. Get your hands moving, gesticulate, use props, dress up in costume – everything and anything goes, generally speaking. As long as it entertains the audience, its fair game. So don’t hold back!

For more tips on performing literature, do have a look at my longer blog post on the matter. And if you’ve made a new year’s resolution to read your writing to an audience, do come and join us at Speak Easy.

David Hartley

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Call for Submissions to Brain of Forgetting

Brain of Forgetting, the journal specialising in literary and artwork connected with the past, is now open until December 31st for submissions to Issue 3: ‘Island’, which will be published in February 2016. We are accepting poetry, short fiction of less than 1000 words, and creative non-fiction of less than 1200 words, as well as artwork. Full details can be viewed on our Submissions page. For a flavour of what we publish, Issue 2 can be downloaded for free.

Thinking of crowdfunding your short stories?

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Although it’s been around for a little while now, there’s still a slight wariness from writers considering the crowdfunding route as a way of getting their next set of short stories published. This is the route that allows writers to generate financial support from their personal and professional networks in exchange for physical rewards, and is emerging as an invaluable marketing tool for self-publishing authors as well as insightfully gauging the interest of a book early on, directly from potential readers.

‘It’s too much work’, ‘It’s not as prestigious’, ‘I might not get as much return for my book’ are all responses you might hear cautious authors giving as they assess their options. And for some books this might be true, but for others, crowdfunding is the route they wish was available years ago.

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The great thing about crowdfunding is that it’s the only form of publishing where readers can obtain the book directly from the author. It connects readers to the person behind the imagination, it attracts writers that are truly passionate about writing and sharing it with their readers, and it also invites readers to take ownership of what they love to read rather than simply judging a book from the safe confines of a bookshop.

You may not become the most famous author through the crowdfunding route, but you’ll certainly be able to grow a strong community of people committed to supporting your work. In addition, the satisfaction of shaping each stage of the writing, design and sharing of your literary masterpiece could be truly fulfilling.

‘With the introduction of crowdfunding, self-publishing no longer has to be a solo venture’. Positive Writer

And that’s where we come in. Here at GOODFRUIT we aim to address the two biggest hurdles to publishing and selling a book – obtaining funding and sourcing expertise. You’ll be able to gain both of these during your crowdfunding campaign through offering rewards in return for financial support (such as a copy of the book), as well as raising a team to help you (graphic designer, editor, printer).

So if you’re a budding or veteran writer we’d love to hear from you. Take a browse of the GOODFRUIT Lewis Literary Contest we’re launching – a contest searching for three writers who want to publish a story or publication they have written or working on. The GOODFRUIT Literary Contest will be calling for short story writers (including other genres) to step into the shoes of inspiring authors in history, to write and publish books with imagination and meaning, to challenge the hearts of readers and to bring their stories to fruition.

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Deadline: 23rd September

Rules and Entry Information: http://goodfruit.co/community/the-goodfruit-literary-contest/

Email literarycontest@goodfruit.co with any question

Dee Atkins is the Community Manager for GOODFRUIT, a new kind of crowdfunding platform where people pledge funds or skills to bring ideas enriching culture to fruition. Our mission is to make it as easy as possible for culturemakers (entrepreneurs, creators, authors) to launch and scale ideas/businesses. Dee loves a good book, second-hand stores and putting on new socks. dee@goodfruit.co