Spooky stories for grown ups

Prepare to be scared this Halloween in the ghostly town of Folkestone!

Hand of Doom Productions once again invites you to gather round and hear some terrifying tales, monstrous monologues and scary sketches by Anthony White, Ribs Norman, Neil Dillon, Michele Sheldon, Adam Skipper, Louise Burgess and Charles Bain Smith.

It takes place on Saturday, October 27 at the Eleto Chocolate Cafe, Rendevous Street, Folkestone, from 8.30pm to 10.30pm. Doors open at 8pm.

Drinks are available from the bar (cash, no cards). Competition during the interval to win some ghoulishly cheap treats.

Tickets cost £6 and are available on the door or from Ticket Source.

Halloween 2018 (2)

 

 

 

 

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Open Pen Summer Party 2

Last year’s Summer Party from Open Pen featured readings from established writers such as Irenosen Okojie, as well as up and coming writers found in the pages of Open Pen, the free short fiction magazine stocked in indie bookshops around the UK. There was jazz, there was comedy, and there was a party.

Slightly further down the Commercial Road in East London, this year’s Open Pen Summer Party is set to promise all that and more (mainly pizza). The child friendly event takes place on Sunday, August 12, and is an all day affair, hosted by The George Tavern. Cheapo tickets (£5) are available now over on Eventbrite.

Already announced to read throughout the day is Fernando Sdrigotti, Mazin Saleem and Xanthi Barker, reading from their forthcoming novelettes to be released by Open Pen, as well as Miggy Angel, London Short Story Prize winning Maria Thomas, and Max Sydney Smith.

The George Tavern is located close to Whitechapel and Shadwell stations. More details and more to be announced over on the Open Pen events page.

Oh, we do like to be beside the seaside…

If you’re visiting Folkestone for the weekend, come and listen to some twisted tales inspired by the town’s beaches and the area’s coastline.

Hand of Doom presents Twisted Tales of the Seaside on Saturday, June 30 from 8pm at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, Folkestone, Kent. Tickets cost £5 and are available from Ticket Source.

Please note: there’s no bar so bring your own drinks.

 

 

Twisted tales: an antidote to Valentine’s Day

Fed up with all the Valentine’s Day drivel? Want to hear some twisted tales of love? Live near Faversham or Folkestone?

Then come along to Twisted Love on Friday, February 16 at The Limes, Preston Street, or  on Saturday, February 17 at the Eleto Chocolate Cafe, Folkestone, from 8pm to hear stories by Michele Sheldon, Mike Blakemore, Charlie Bain-Smith with a very special appearance from preying mantis duo Burgess and Norman.

Tickets cost £5. For Faversham go to https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/event/FFELGF and for Folkestone go to https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/448629 .

Cash bar only at Folkestone.

Twisted love 2018

Twisted Love: an antidote to Valentine’s

Hate hearts and flowers?

Hand of Doom presents not one but two nights of alternative love stories.

The first takes place on Valentine’s Day, Tuesday, February 14 at the Old Wine Vaults, Faversham, from 8pm to 11pm followed by another on Friday, February 17 from 8pm to 11pm at Folkestone’s historic hotel The Grand.

Gather round to hear a host of twisted tales of the heart brought to life by actors and writers. Come alone, or with your partner but don’t expect romance.

Writers include Charlotte Forfieh, Kate van der Borgh, Mike Blakemore, Truda Thurai, Ribs Norman and Michele Sheldon.

Tickets:

Faversham £3 on the door.

Folkestone £6 from Ticket Source or £7 on the door.

For more details go to Twisted Love.

 

faversham-twisted-lovetwisted-love-poster-folk

Selected Tragedy, Submissions Call and (Tragic) Winter is Coming

You may be interested in helping the Storylines team create theatre from News on the first Friday of every month and if you are follow @ampersandmedia on twitter and get involved. The next Storylines is on 6th February.

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Stand Up Tragedy has been taking a break from our live shows but over on the podcast we’ve been producing  Selected Tragedy which are themed collections of highlights from three years of tragedy:

 

Our next live show will be Tragic Winter at the Hackney Attic on Saturday 28th February.

Stand Up Tragedy aims to make audiences laugh until they cry and cry until they laugh. It’s a regular live show and podcast where people stand up and tell tragedy. We make you sad; we make you think; we make you smile. Expect music, comedy, fiction, spoken word, true stories and more, all playing up to the tragic form but not always taking it too seriously. The night ends, not with a whimper, not with a bang, but with a cathartic sing-a-long.

At Stand Up Tragedy we combine established acts like Stewert Lee, Josie Long, Eddie Pepitone, Grace Petrie, Rob Auton, Sara Pascoe and Andy Zaltzman with new and upcoming acts in an evening of tragic variety based around a theme. Performers often write new material especially for the night and relish the opportunity to put a tragic spin on what they do. The nights are recorded and put out as a weekly podcast.

Call for Submissions:

Earlier this year we relaunched the SUT blog with an updated look and a new focus. Like its raucous live counterpart, the Stand Up Tragedy blog will be a place find the humour of hurt, the tickle of tragedy and mirth of misfortune. Selected work will posted each Friday beginning 1st August and promoted via the Stand Up Tragedy London monthly events, the podcast and at the Edinburgh Fringe.

What: short stories (fiction and non-fiction), flash fiction, poetry, and experimental form (that can be digitally distributed) that fits with the theme of tragedy. Or tragicomedy. Or comitragedy.  Ideal length is 250-1000 words, though shorter pieces, and longer work that can be serialised, will be considered. Editorial support or feedback can be offered to those who request it.

Format: Word doc or docx – double spaced—name and title on every page and paginated, please.

Deadline: Rolling.

Please email to akshoosmith@gmail.com with “SUT Submission” in the subject line.

In the press:

“Laugh? I Nearly Died: The Rise of Stand-Up Tragedy” (Independent, July 2012)

“Stand-Up Tragedy” (London Word, January 2013)

One of the Guardian’s “Ten Great Storytelling Nights” (March 2014)

“Stand-up comedy with Sophocles and Justin Bieber during World Cup football” (John Fleming, June 2014)

 

Bunbury Magazine Issue Six

Hey Bunburyists! 

Remember that time when we did Bunbury Magazine and it had all manner of wonderful Bunburying things in it, like poetry and art? Oh, and all the Bunburyful short stories and interviews with marvelous people? You don’t?

            That’s alright because we are back! Back with a brand new issue for you; an issue you won’t forget in an hurry. And here it is:

http://issuu.com/bunburymagazine/docs/bunbury-issue_-six

            Since we last spoke, the rarest of things occurred – we actually had a holiday! Two, in fact, because we are bourgeois. We spent a week amongst the rolling sands and omnipresent cream teas of the South Coast. Whilst there, we had the chance to visit Kents Caverns in Tourquay, which was used as the basis for Hamspley Cavern. A prize to any of you fabulous people who know in which book it features. And no google! Just send us an email.

            The second holiday was more a labour of love than a rest – the love of bringing you all the high-standard splendiforousness you see before you.

            We spent five days in Edinburgh for the Fringe Festival. Five days of running around like blue-arsed proverbials, fuelled by coffee and neeps, seeing comedy and poetry performed by some of the finest comedians and poets it has been our pleasure to encounter. The feature for this issue presents to you the very best of the Free Fringe, but we won’t give too much away right now. We will just let you immerse yourselves in what they had to say, as well as the brilliant poetry, art and stories we have for you this time round.

There are many many people to thank for this issue, both for their support and for getting involved. We will go through section by section so we do not miss anyone out!

The beautiful front cover and the artwork was provided by Katryn Beaty.

Flash fiction by Joseph Roberts and William Morris.

Life Writing by Becca Hazleden.

Our non-fiction essay was written by our wonderful resident Bunburyist Amanda Madison.

The stunning poetry was submitted by David Subacchi, Karen Little, Leanne Drain and Sarah Hussain.

Engrossing short stories by Andrew Lee-Hart, Christian Carter-Stephenson, Edward Hodgson, Katryn Beaty and Paul O’Sulliavan.

We were so pleased to present Part Four of ‘Yum Yum’ by Kurt Jarram and give you the first part of ‘Unnecessary Person’ by Isaac Swift.

We also had the pleasure of doing a book promotion for a good friend of the magazine, Stephen James.

It was our honour to give Armageddon Stereo, a brand-new wholly awesome rap-core metal band from Manchester, their first ever interview.

And, here we go, our big feature on the Edinburgh Fringe Festival included Aiden Killian, Andrew Blair, Charmain Hughes, Darren Walsh, Fay Roberts, Hannah Chutzpah, James Christopher, Laurie Bolger, Mel Jones, Nygel Harrot, Chris Chopping, Phil Cooper, Stuart Laws, Amy Acre, Ben Target, Beth Vyse, Cormac Friel, Martin Sichel of the Panda Villa HotelRichard Hartnell, Ross McCleary, Pierre Hollins and Christian Reilly.

We are also looking forward now to the next issue of Bunbury Magazine. The theme is ‘The Unexplained.’ Have you ever seen or heard something so truly out there it almost defies rationality? If you have, we would love to see your wonderful work again!

As always, you can find all our social media garb at the bottom of this email. If you aren’t already following us on Twitter or have us on the Book of Face then add us and we can tag all those who have been part of this issue and past issues as well!

And as you know, we do not charge at all for reading this beautiful magazine – that’s just not who we are. All we ask is a share on Twitter or Facebook. Just something like ‘Hey guys, check out this zine I was published in.’ or ‘About to read Bunbury Magazine because I like my eyes and want to give them pleasure.’ Or even ‘HOLY F**KB**LS! I’M F*****G N THIS F*****G MAGAZINE! THIS IS F*****G AMAAAAAAZNG! READ IT AND EXPLODE WITH JOY!’             

Ahem. So we won’t keep you any longer. Thanks for coming to see us again. We hope you enjoy your stay. Don’t be strangers now.

            Keep Bunburying!

            Christopher and Keri.

PS – there may not be a prize for the ‘Hampsley Cavern’ competition anymore. It was a cookie but we ate it!