The Gilded Lily & Gold Lamé Shorts

The prompt for this month’s A3 Review contest is: Gold Things. We suggest writing about all that gliters and is gold. Submit flash fiction, brief essays and poems about lost wedding rings, edible gold leaf and hidden gold bullion. Tell the story of a heist in 150 words, or write a poem about a heist gone wrong. Tell the story of a day in the life of a detectorist. Write the story behind the gold medal you won, or almost won, or wish you’d won.

You could explore different idioms with “gold” in them: a heart of gold, good as gold, silence is golden. Write about rainbows and what’s at the end of them. You could write a non-fiction piece about the brutal reality of gold mines. Tell the story of a person looking back at the golden age of their life, or make it your story.

Be inspired by Rachel Hadas’ poem “Green and Gold” and Sandra M. Gilbert’s “Gold Tooth” – then write about your own golden fruit and gold tooth.

Some suggestions for opening words… start with “Gold is the colour of…” or “When I think of gold…”

This month’s contest is inspired by The Description Writing Map.

As always, The A3 Review welcomes short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 panel.

Come say hi on Twitter @TheA3Review

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Fictive Dream Call for Submissions

Just over three weeks left to submit to Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February in which we will feature a new piece of flash fiction throughout February 2018. That’s a new story every day starting on 1 February for the entire month.

As always we’re interested in stories with a contemporary feel but for Flash Fiction February we’re putting a squeeze on the word count so only stories between 250 – 750 words please. Deadline December 31 2017.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

See out Flash Fiction February submission guidelines here.

For standard submissions we remain open as usual.

We’re looking forward to receiving your best. This is our last blog for the year so from all at Fictive Dream Happy Holidays! 

Laura Black
Editor

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Website http://www.fictivedream.com
Twitter @FictiveDream

 

Windows and Reminders

stamp windowWe’d like to remind you that Issue 7 of The A3 Review is here. Click here to order a copy. We’d also like to remind you that the November deadline for our monthly contest is just a few days away. November the 25th is when we start reading submissions for our WINDOWS-themed contest.

Click here for inspiration and prompts, and for submission details. You could write about windows you’ve looked into and windows you’ve looked out of. Or write about a character standing at a hotel window, witnessing something they’ll never forget, or something that makes them laugh. Look into the metafictional potential of the window

You could write about broken windows and throwing pebbles at a lover’s window. Write about glasshouses. Write about a particular type of window, anything from a witch window to a bay window. Write about eyes, for they are the window to the soul. Write about a character who loves to window shop, or a day in the life of a window dresser.

You could write about the windows in your day, or a character’s day and call it “All the Day’s Windows” or “A Day of Windows.” You could write a piece and start with the words: “The tiny window in his cell…” or “From the hospital bed she could see…” or, to steal the opening lines of a famous song: “Looking out on the pouring rain…”

This month’s contest is inspired by the Write Around the House Writing Map. As always, we welcome short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 panel.

One more reminder… our Brief Critique option is still only $15 (that’s about £11, depending on the state of the world on any specific day!). More and more writers are taking us up on the offer, and this is what some have said: “Very constructive. Good level of detail… Intelligent, direct, and useful suggestions for improvement.” For just $15 we’ll provide a line edit of your submission and feedback on ways to take your work to the next level. Choose the Brief Critique add-on, and you’ll be able to pay together with your entry fee. Critiques are provided after the month’s winning entries have been announced.

And one fnal reminder… Write! Write Write! Write wherever you are. Here’s some suggestions from The A3 Review‘s editor, Shaun Levin.

Open Pen Releases Twentieth Issue

Hitting a handful of London bookshops way back in early 2011, Open Pen has just released its twentieth issue and can be found in bookshops around the country now. The free short fiction journal is stocked in over forty bookshops these days, as well as bars, pubs, cafes, universities and writers’ centres. It even has a stockist in Cuba.

Twenty issues of Open Pen has brought the magazine close to a hundred short stories from almost as many fiction writers. The red and black coloured issue sees Louisa Adjoa Parker, Dan Coxon, Jim Gibson, Jonnie McAloon, Katherine Orton, Simon Pinkerton, Elissa Soave, Dan Ayres, Gary W. Hartley, and Gerard McKeown join the fold. Their fiction is varied and yet bound together by their relevance, as has become a part of the identity of Open Pen. As always, regular contributor N Quentin Woolf is on hand to deliver the killer blow. that just leaves editor Sean Preston to deliver a nutshell report on the thrills and plentiful spills of the first twenty issues.

You can subscribe to Open Pen here, but why pay when you can get to a bookshop and get it for free? As has always been the mag’s hope, why not pick up a book whilst you’re there? Something different, something you wouldn’t usually go for. Something with bite. That’d make Open Pen happiest of all.

Three of the stories from Issue Twenty live online over on the mag’s website. Check out The Thursday Club by Elissa Soave, Handjob by Dan Ayres, and Of Course by Gary W. Hartley.

Here’s hoping there’s another twenty issues ahead.

Fictive Dream Special Call for Submissions

New from Fictive Dream is Flash Fiction February in which we will feature a new piece of flash fiction throughout February 2018. That’s a new story every day starting on 1 February for the entire month.

As always we’re interested in stories with a contemporary feel but for Flash Fiction February we’re putting a squeeze on the word count so only stories between 250 – 750 words please. Deadline December 31 2017.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

See out Flash Fiction February submission guidelines here.

For standard submissions we remain open as usual.

We’re looking forward to receiving your best!

Laura Black
Editor

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Website http://www.fictivedream.com
Twitter @FictiveDream

 

Bunbury is back with Fallout.

So here we are again with Bunbury Magazine, dear Bunburyists. Issue seventeen. It feels like seventeen should the unlucky number, not thirteen. Thirteen gets a bad rap, probably because it got caught in the fallout of those Friday the Thirteenth films.

Oh, fallout! That’s why we’re here. It’s not often we get that distracted that early on. This is our fallout themed issue. We thought it timely going with this theme given everything going on in the world right now. As you know, we here at Bunbury towers try to stay non-partisan in all things outside of creativity but there are some things – some big things lurking around the world – that just cannot be ignored.

Our suggestion? Hunker down with plenty of water, canned food and ride out the fallout with this new issue. As usual, it’s packed to the reinforced-steel rafters with poetry, short stories, art and all of the nice things to help you escape from the outside world (REMAIN INDOORS). We also have a superb feature and interview with the very talented Aaron Kent, curator of Poetic Interviews, one of the most exciting projects happening in the poetry at the moment.

You can get this brand new issue but clicking the gorgeous front cover below (very expertly created by Amy Telfer). It is on pay-what-you-like but we suggest £3 for something so lovingly put together. Alternatively, if you pay £15 for this or any other issue, we will send you a copy of the Bunbury Creative Anthology Vol. 1, which contains the best bits from the first 12 issues. Come on, that’s a bargain!

Speaking of exciting, there are exciting times afoot here at Bunbury. Last issue, we introduced Dean Rhetoric to you, our new poetry editor, who has also put together amazing features for us and you (The Best Kept Secrets in Poetry last time)!

Well our team has expanded evermore. We would now like you all to welcome Malika M Street, who has joined us as poetry editor (and also helps us run our spoken word sister event Just Write). We also have Fiona Nuttall, who will be editing the short story section from here on in. We are so thrilled to have these three beautiful humans on board. We have no doubt that each section will be full to the brim with the highest quality you can find!

In other OTHER news, our doors are once again open for submissions. The theme is THE HUNT for issue 18. You can find our submissions guidelines and more how to get in touch on our website (just click the thing below!)

With all that, enough of the dillying and dallying. We must away to put on our tin hats and crouch under a rickety, match-stick table. Keep calm and Bunbury.

Much love and keep scribbling!

Christopher and Keri.