The Reflex Spring 2020 flash fiction competition is open!

Spring 2020 - Reflex Fiction - Flash Fiction Competition shortstops
Reflex Fiction is a quarterly international flash fiction competition for stories between 180 and 360 words. We publish one story every day as we count down to the winner of each competition.

We had a fantastic response to our Winter ’19 competition: 515 entries from 30 different countries. We’re busy reading and judging in preparation for announcing the longlist on 1 January. In the meantime, the next round of the competition is now open for entries.

We’re delighted to have flash fiction aficionado Kathy Fish acting as judge. Here are the important details:

Prizes: £1,000 / £500 / £250 (or the equivalent in your local currency)
Entry fee: Choose your own!
Deadline: 29 February 2020
Judging: March 2020
Longlist announced: 1 April 2020
Judge: Kathy Fish
Submissions: via our online entry form.

Flash Fiction Editor Vacancy

We’re currently recruiting an editor to manage flash fiction submissions for online publications. See our website for all the details.

Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February 2020

Exactly three weeks left to submit your best flash fiction to Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February 2020.  

During Flash Fiction February, now in its third year, we will feature a new piece of flash fiction throughout the month. That’s a new story, every day, starting on 1 February right through to February 29. Our submissions window will remain open until December 31, 2019.

As always, we’re interested in material with a contemporary feel on any subject. Your stories may be challenging, dramatic, playful, exhilarating, even cryptic. Above all, they must be well-crafted and compelling.

We’ve put a squeeze on our usual word count though, so only stories of between 200–750 words please.

Read our Flash Fiction February 2020 submission guidelines here.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

For those of you who prefer to write longer stories we remain open to standard submissions (500–2,500 words). 

We’re looking forward to receiving your best work!

Laura Black
Editor

Website www.fictivedream.com
Twitter @fictivedream
Instagram fictive.dream

Story Friday LEAP! Call for submissions

Story Friday in February has the theme LEAP! in celebration of 2020 as a leap year. Story Friday is on 28th February, the day before the leaping day, and we want to revel in the glory of this springing theme! Whether your stories feature proposals or boxing hares, Christmas lords or death defying jumps, we are so looking forward to reading what you come up with!

Story Friday LEAP! will be on 28th February, deadline for submissions is 17th February. We’re looking for stories that are 2,000 words or fewer.  (Full submission details are here).  Writers must be available to come to Bath for the event.  If you’d rather not read, we have wonderful actors who can read your story for you.

For more information about Story Friday, to listen to stories that we have recorded at our events over the years, and/or to submit your story please visit A Word In Your Ear.

December Round-Up

Competitions

CLOSING TODAY: the Ruth Rendell Short Story Competition for stories of up to 1000 words. Ouen Press short story competition for stories on the theme of ‘the gift’  closes 31st December.

Lit Mags & Chapbooks

The A3 Review has announced its new contest themes. Fictive Dream is calling for submissions for Flash Fiction February 2020.

Workshops & Courses

Haringey Live Lit are running a Novella Fever course beginning end Jan in London. Claire Keegan is holding a manuscript workshop in Dublin on Dec 7th, and will be running a residential writing weekend in Tullow, Ireland, Jan 3-5th.

Live Lit & Festivals

Talking Tales will hold its next event on Dec 10th in Bristol, which will be an anthology launch for To Hull and Back. White Rabbit is calling for submissions for an evening of short stories in Ashford, Kent, on the theme of ‘Wonder’ in March 2020.

Novella Fever with Kiare Ladner: Spring 2020

Do you have a short story with potential for growth? Or one that’s out of control and getting longer and longer? Maybe it’s a novella in disguise. Join Picador author and short story writer Kiare Ladner for a really intensive work out on all things novella! Novella Fever is for anyone serious about getting stuck into a mid-length piece of fiction. Wednesday evenings 6.45pm-9.15pm; Jan 29, Feb 5, 12, (half term), 26, March 4, 11; cost £99; venue Writing Room, Floor 3, Wood Green Works, Cumberland Road, Wood Green, London N22 7SG

In six weeks, we will aim to start (or finish) drafting a novella. What you work on may be only slightly longer than a short story or slightly shorter than a novel. You may have an idea to explore, or a short story that’s growing, or something resembling a novel in progress. On the course, we will look at what gives this particular form its power. We will think about the value of the instinctive in our writing. We will discuss the general shape a story of this length this may take. In intensive weekly sessions we will workshop both writing and story ideas. All levels welcome.

If interested, contact Kate Pemberton at kate@collage-arts.org or for more information check: http://haringeyliteraturelive.com/spring-courses-2020/

Manuscript-based Workshop with Claire Keegan

December 7, 2019, 9.30am to 5pm

Dublin city centre

A unique opportunity to have your work read and critiqued by Claire Keegan, as well as to learn more about the writing process.

Tuition is 300 Euro with the submission of a 3,000 words manuscript, or 150 Euro without a manuscript.

There is only one place remaining!

To book, email ckfictionclinic@yahoo.com

Read reviews on Claire’s workshops and courses.

 

KEEGAN Claire

Subject: KEEGAN Claire – Copyright: Philippe MATSAS/Opale – Date: 20121017-

Talking Tales #26 – 10th December – Bristol

Talking Tales is open for submissions for the next event on Tuesday 10th December 2019.

Here is our manifesto:

  •  the ‘To Hull and Back Anthology 2019‘ will be launched on the night
  •  many of the authors featured in the anthology will be reading
  •  you could read too – this time stories of 500 words might get our vote
  • The Right Honourable Christopher Fielden will be the Leader of the House
  •  we pledge you will laugh and be entertained in equal measure

TaToHullAndBack2019frontcoverlking Tales is a lovely night of stories, with a warm audience in a great venue. If this sounds like your kind of party then put pen to paper and vote with your feet.

Submissions close late on Friday 29th November 2019 – send your stories by e-mail to: stokescroftwriters@gmail.com

Event details – are stupendously straight-forward:

…venue:     Left Bank, 128 Cheltenham Road, Stokes Croft, Bristol BS6 5RW

…time:       we start at 6:30 pm on Tuesday 10th December 2019

…join-in:    the ‘finish the lines’ competition – win a Talking Tales badge.

Stokes Croft Writers would love to see you there.

P.S. It’s #26 – no recounts.

 

The A3 Review’s New Contest Themes

issue_11_cover_grandeThe A3 Review has recently launched Issue 11. We’ve also just posted new themes for our monthly contests. Publication and cash prizes for winners. To enter and for more details, please visit our Submittable page by clicking here. The next few themes will be included in our “T” issue, so we’re looking for short stories (as well as poems and artwork) about : Tablets, Transformations, and Thanatos.

The two winning entries from September 2019 to February 2020 will make up the list of contributors to Issue 12 (The “T” Issue). From this list, three overall winners will receive cash prizes: 1st = £250, 2nd = £150, 3rd = £75. Issue 12 will appear in April 2020.

The word limit is 150 words, so we’d particularly like to see flash fiction and mini essays. Our $5 (approx £3.50) submission fee helps us cover admin and printing costs and makes sure we can keep offering cash prizes.

Visit The A3 Review’s website to see some back issues. The A3 Press also publishes chapbooks and is open for submissions until December the 10th.

November Round-Up

News

We welcome a new lit mag to our Lit Mags list – Fat Cat magazine! “the new (and maybe kinda uncool) kid on the block, and we’re passionate about giving a home to the words of writers, especially those at the beginning of their careers.”

Live Lit & Festivals

White Rabbit is calling for submissions for an evening of short stories in Ashford, Kent, on the theme of ‘Wonder’ in March 2020. Untitled Writers is holding its third salon on Nov 7th in London.

Competitions

Reflex Fiction has announced its Summer 2019 flash fiction contest winners, the Autumn longlist, and submissions for the Winter contest are still open. Ouen Press short story competition for stories on the theme of ‘the gift’ is now open, deadline 31st December. and the Ruth Rendell Short Story Competition for stories of up to 1000 words closes on Dec 2nd.

Lit Mags

Fictive Dream is calling for submissions for Flash Fiction February 2020, and submissions are still open for Shooter lit mag‘s “supernatural” issue.

Workshops & Courses

Claire Keegan is running a residential writing weekend in Tullow, Ireland, Jan 3-5th.

Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February 2020

The submissions window for Fictive Dream’s Flash Fiction February 2020 is now open.

During Flash Fiction February, now in its third year, we will feature a new piece of flash fiction throughout the month. That’s a new story, every day, starting on 1 February right through to February 29. Our submissions window will remain open until December 31, 2019.

As always, we’re interested in material with a contemporary feel on any subject. Your stories may be challenging, dramatic, playful, exhilarating, even cryptic. Above all, they must be well-crafted and compelling.

We’ve put a squeeze on our usual word count though, so only stories of between 200–750 words please.

Read our Flash Fiction February 2020 submission guidelines here.

Check out the Fictive Dream website here.

For those of you who prefer to write longer stories we remain open to standard submissions (500–2,500 words). 

We’re looking forward to receiving your best work!

Laura Black
Editor

Website www.fictivedream.com
Twitter @fictivedream
Instagram fictive.dream

Residential Writing Weekend with Claire Keegan

Teach Bhride Holistic Centre, Tullow, Co. Carlow, Ireland 3 to 5 January 2020

This residential weekend will see all participants arriving at Teach Bhride on Friday afternoon before dinner. The next two mornings will be spent writing in any genre in well lighted, quiet spaces without mobile phones.

Lectures and discussions will be held in the afternoons and evenings on the following:

  • Letters by Anton Chekhov & others

  • Paris Review/Writers at Work Interviews

  • Essays by Eudora Welty, Frank O’Connor and Flannery O’Connor

  • Hemingway’s advice on writing

  • Some poems on writing and creativity

  • Viewing of A Private World, a documentary on John McGahern

Tuition includes all meals and two nights’ accommodation, with everyone arriving before dinner on Friday, helping themselves to breakfast both mornings, and leaving before dinner on Sunday evening. This course will suit anyone interested in a quiet weekend of writing. None of what is written will be read aloud. It’s a chance to engage with the intricacies of the creative process and use your imagination.

To book your place, contact ckfictionclinic@yahoo.com Tuition is 400 Euro. A 50% deposit secures. See CKFictionClinic for more information.

KEEGAN ClaireClaire Keegan’s portrait taken in the offices of Sabine Wespieser, Publisher, Paris

Claire Keegan’s story collections include Antarctica, Walk the Blue Fields and Foster (Faber & Faber). These stories, translated into 17 languages, have won numerous awards. Her debut, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year. “These stories are among the finest stories recently written in English,” wrote the Observer. Walk the Blue Fields, her second collection, was Richard Ford’s Book of the Year in 2010, and won the Edge Hill Prize, awarded to the strongest collection published in the British Isles. Foster won the Davy Byrne’s Award, the then world’s richest prize for a single story. New Yorker readers chose Foster as their story of the year. It was also published in Best American Stories and is now on the school syllabus in Ireland. Keegan has earned an international reputation as a teacher of fiction, having taught workshops on four continents.

Every line seems to be a lesson in the perfect deployment of both style and emotion.” Hilary Mantel

The best stories are so textured and so moving, so universal but utterly distinctive, that it’s easy to imagine readers savoring them many years from now and to imagine critics, far in the future, deploying new lofty terms to explain what it is that makes Keegan’s fiction work.” The New York Times

Every single word in the right place and pregnant with double meaning.” Jeffrey Eugenides, The New York Times

Keegan is a rarity, someone I will always want to read.” Richard Ford

Spooky stories for grown ups

Are you brave enough to listen to Halloween tales in a haunted Folkestone bar?

The ghosts of Eleto Chocolate Cafe, Rendevous Street, are once again hosting Hand of Doom’s Spooky Stories for Grown Ups on Saturday, October 26.

Come and and hear some monstrous, terrifying and silly tales from 8pm.

Drinks are available from the bar. Competition during the interval to win some ghoulishly cheap treats.

Tickets cost £6 and are available on the door or from Ticket Source.

spooky stories 2019 jpeg

Beginnings, Middles, Endings: The Structure of a Narrative with Claire Keegan

Goldsmiths University, London

November 2 & 3, 2019. 9:30am–5pm, both days

Claire Keegan, internationally acclaimed author and fiction-writing coach, will direct this, her most popular fiction writing course, using a novel and two short stories to demonstrate and explore the mechanics of fiction writing and narrative structure.

1. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

2. “Good Country People” by Flannery O’Connor

3. “Nobody Said Anything” by Raymond Carver

How do stories begin? How and why does an author make an incision in time and build tension? How is a reader drawn into a narrative? We will also explore the much-neglected middle; the trunk of the story, its denouement and turning points — and ask if endings are natural. Why do stories need to end, to find a place of rest? The discussion around endings will focus on falling action, emotional consequences and inevitability. Participants will also examine the differences between the short story and the novel.

This weekend will be of particular interest to those who write, teach, read or edit fiction — but anyone with an interest in how fiction works is welcome to attend.

To book your place, contact ckfictionclinic@yahoo.com Tuition is £350. A 50% deposit secures.

IMG_3242 (1)

Claire Keegan’s story collections include Antarctica, Walk the Blue Fields and Foster (Faber & Faber). These stories, translated into 17 languages, have won numerous awards. Her debut, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year. “These stories are among the finest stories recently written in English,” wrote the Observer. Walk the Blue Fields, her second collection, was Richard Ford’s Book of the Year in 2010, and won the Edge Hill Prize, awarded to the strongest collection published in the British Isles. Foster won the Davy Byrne’s Award, the then world’s richest prize for a single story. New Yorker readers chose Foster as their story of the year. It was also published in Best American Stories and is now on the school syllabus in Ireland. Keegan has earned an international reputation as a teacher of fiction, having taught workshops on four continents.

Every line seems to be a lesson in the perfect deployment of both style and emotion.” –Hilary Mantel

The best stories are so textured and so moving, so universal but utterly distinctive, that it’s easy to imagine readers savoring them many years from now and to imagine critics, far in the future, deploying new lofty terms to explain what it is that makes Keegan’s fiction work.” – The New York Times

Every single word in the right place and pregnant with double meaning.” – Jeffrey Eugenides, The New York Times

Keegan is a rarity, someone I will always want to read.” – Richard Ford

WONDER- seeking short story writers for a candlelit immersive live lit event PLUS FREE writing workshop!

White Rabbit is Bernadette Russell and Gareth Brierley- a multi  award-winning arts organisation which creates films, podcasts, theatre and immersive live lit /storytelling events. 

We are writers and performers who are passionate about stories and storytelling. We are delighted to be working with Revelation in Ashford to create two immersive live lit evenings of short stories on the theme of WONDER.

We are inviting short story submissions inspired by the  theme of WONDER, with a maximum of 1500 words in any style. Priority will be given to Kent writers or writers with an association with Kent. 

We will select stories from the submissions to be performed live on two consecutive evenings by our team of professional actors, in  the candlelit environment of the beautiful and ancient St Mary’ Church (referenced in the Doomsday Book in 1086!).

We look forward to this event being a great opportunity for Kent writers to showcase their work. As writers you need do no more than submit your work, once it is selected then you can come along to the event, relax and enjoy the show!

Deadlines for submissions are: Midnight on 14th February 2020. Please submit your stories on the theme of WONDER to gbbrierley@btinternet.com with the subject heading WONDER. Please ensure your name is on each page of your story (in the header or footer if possible) 

The shows are 21st and 22nd March 2020 at 7.30pm. 

We are also hosting two FREE writing and performing workshops- the first being on 9th November- a chance to be inspired by the beautiful church and graveyard and to have a space to write! Details are here

Our website is currently under re-construction- so in the meantime please visit this link for further information and FAQ: https://www.bernadetterussell.com/single-post/2019/10/10/WONDER–FAQ-for-writers 

If you would like to see a film of previous storytelling events please go here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogo9Pl6LSCE 

This project has been commissioned by Revelation Ashford and is supported by Ashford Borough Council, Arts Council England, Kent County Council and Music Venues Alliance

Reflex Fiction Summer 2019 Winners!

Autumn 2019 Winners - Reflex Fiction - Flash Fiction Competition - shortstops
Reflex Fiction is a quarterly international flash fiction competition for stories between 180 and 360 words. We publish one story every day as we count down to the winner of each competition.

Summer 2019 Winners

At the end of September, we published the three winning stories from our Summer 2019 flash fiction competition as chosen by Claire Fuller. Here are the winners and links to the stories:

First Place: The Puncture by Lauren Collett
Second Place: Do Not Tell Me We Are Friends by Alice Franklin
Third Place: Growing In the Dust by Dona McCormack

You can read Claire’s thoughts on the winning stories here.

Autumn 2019 Long-List

We’ve also just published the long-list for our Autumn 2019 competition and have started publishing stories as we count down to the announcement of the winners at the end of December.

Winter 2019 – Choose your own entry fee

We’re also accepting entries for our Winter 2019 competition. For this round, we’re delighted to have Barbara Byar, author of the forthcoming Reflex Press book Some Days Are Better Than Ours as our judge.

We’re continuing with our choose-your-own-entry-fee system. If the suggested entry fee of £7 is prohibitive, just pay what you can afford. If you’d like to support a writer who can’t afford the full fee, why not add a pound or two? More details on our website.

Here are the important details:

Prizes: £1,000 first, £500 second, £250 third (or the equivalent in your local currency)
Entry Fee: Choose your own
Entries close: 30 November 2019
Judge: Barbara Byar

SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY

 

October Round-Up

Lit Mags & Chapbooks

Fictive Dream is open for submissions for Flash Fiction February 2020. Pixel Heart is calling for submissions for its 4th issue, on the theme of ‘joy’, deadline Nov 1st, and submissions are now open for Shooter lit mag‘s “supernatural” issue.

Competitions

Ouen Press short story competition for stories on the theme of ‘the gift’ is now open, deadline 31st December. Oct 31st is the deadline for entries to A Story for Daniel, a flash fiction competition raising awareness of childhood cancer support. And you have until Dec 2nd to enter the Ruth Rendell Short Story Competition for stories of up to 1000 words.

Live Lit & Festivals

Warwick Live Lit is holding a spooky lit event, Words That Go Bump In The Night, on Oct 10th. Story Friday wants your stories on the theme of ‘Chemistry’ by Oct 28th for its Nov 8th event in Bath. Judy Darley invites you to the launch of her second short story collection, in the company of several other writers, in Waterstones, Bristol on Nov 2nd. Untitled Writers is holding its third salon on Nov 7th in London.

Workshops & Courses

Curtis Brown Creative is running a six-week online short story course taught by Cynan Jones, starting on Oct 17th. Haringey Live Lit’s weekly short story workshop with Kiare Ladner begins on Oct 30th in London.The next 30 Days of Writing online course begins on November 1st, run by Shaun Levin, editor of the A3 Review.

Short Story Workshop with award-winning writer Kiare Ladner – starts October 30.

Wednesday evenings, 6.45pm-9.15pm; dates October 30, (no class November 6), November 13, 20, 27, December 4, 11; cost £99; venue Collage Writing Room, Wood Green Works, 40 Cumberland Road London N22 7SG. Click for details of courses. To book, email kate@collage-arts.org

The short story – liberating to get down, exacting to get right! Over six intensive sessions, we’ll explore the art and craft of the form. In doing so, we’ll look rigorously at your own stories, alongside a diverse range by other writers. From the traditional to the experimental, from character-based to thematically driven, from stories that expand a moment to those that cover a lifetime, we’ll discuss what works, how it works and why it works. Come along if you’d like to be inspired, motivated and challenged in your practice. All levels welcome.

Kiare’s short story ‘Van Rensburg’s Card’ was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award 2018. She has a Creative Writing PhD, which focused on short fiction (stories and novellas) while exploring Italo Calvino’s concept of lightness. Before this, she did a Creative Writing MA at the University of East Anglia for which she was given the David Higham Literary Agency Bursary Award. Her short stories have been shortlisted or received honourable mentions in competitions including the Bridport Prize, the Short Fiction Competition, the Short Sharp Stories Award, storySouth Million Writers Award and Glimmer Train. Kiare Ladner’s debut novel Nightshift will be published by Picador in autumn 2019.

Writing Short Stories with Cynan Jones

Write and edit a complete short story and learn essential fiction-writing techniques on Curtis Brown Creative’s brand new six-week online course, Writing Short Stories led by award-winning short story writer Cynan Jones. Cynan won the Betty Trask award for his novel The Long Dry and he won BBC National Short Story Award in 2017, for which he was on the 2019 judging panel . His short stories have appeared in a variety of anthologies and in journals and magazines including Granta and the New Yorker.

We interviewed Cynan to find out more about his love of short fiction…

You won the BBC National Short Story Prize for your story The Edge of the Shoal in 2017 and now you’re on this year’s judging panel for the prize. How does it feel to come full circle? And what do you look for when reading short stories for competitions?

Judging the competition has certainly pointed out what an extraordinary thing it was to win. Ultimately, all a writer can do is write as strongly as he or she can, and work on a story until it’s the best possible piece they can produce. What happens to that story is a product of the work and attention put in. If nothing else, I know I’ve really worked hard to write strongly. In many ways then, it feels less of a circle and more of a starting point! What next? I’m always aiming to challenge myself.

The sense a writer has challenged him or herself is in the best stories too. You read great pieces and think, ‘How!? How did they write that?’ Such stories feel both totally impossible to write, but as if they couldn’t be written better.

When reading stories for competitions I look for that. Stories that take narrative risks and show the technical ability to make those risks pay off. That’s much rarer than you think.

What initially inspired you to start writing in short fiction?

I think several elements led me to shorter forms. Firstly, the thing of reading a story from start to finish in one sitting. I loved that as a reader and – as most of us are copyists when we first start writing – wanted to replicate that experience.

I also think that, even in my initial attempts at serious writing, the way my prose hit the page lent itself to shorter form. I aimed always to put a picture down as simply and powerfully as I could and relied on the reader to think and feel in response. That meant I didn’t write a great deal of explanation or back story, or direct a reader how to react. In itself, that makes for fewer words.

In retrospect, perhaps too there were constraints as to how long I could really dedicate to the process of writing when I first started. I usually had about three months for writing at the beginning of the year before the freelance work I did at the time really got going. Perhaps that made me feel I needed to write something I could start and finish in one block. (Which loops back to the first thing I mentioned here, about the immersive experience of starting and finishing something in one go.)

We’re thrilled to have you on board as the teacher of our brand-new Writing Short Stories course. What’s your favourite part of teaching?

Probably how teaching makes you dig into your own process and really work to understand it so you can pass what you know on.

Other than the help of the world-class authors I read, I taught myself to write. Because of that, it’s only since teaching that I’ve really dissected exactly what it is I do, and that’s helped me take things further.

Could you share your top three tips for writers who want to start writing short stories?

Read.

Work at the craft.

Don’t write to be published.

Read the full interview with Cynan over on the Curtis Brown Creative blog.

Curtis Brown Creative’s brand new Writing Short Stories course led by Cynan Jones is open now for enrolment. It starts on October 17th 2019.

Short Stops readers can get an exclusive 10% off by using code: SHORTSTOPSCBC

 

Call for Submissions: Pixel Heart Literary Magazine – Issue Four: Joy

Screenshot 2019-10-01 19.35.27

Pixel Heart Literary Magazine is currently open for submissions for its fourth issue, which has the theme of Joy.

The magazine publishes flash fiction (under 750 words), poetry (of any length), and short stories (1,000 – 2,500 words) as long as they adhere to the issue’s theme.

There is no submission fee, and submissions are open to all – experienced and new writers alike.

Pixel Heart Literary Magazine is dedicated to publishing writers who are disabled, LGBT, and/or writers of colour, as well as writers from a working-class background. While all submissions will be considered with great care, if writers state in their submission email that they are any of the above, then their submission will be given a little extra attention.

For more specific submission guidelines and information on how to submit, please click here. Submissions for Issue Four: Joy are currently open until midnight BST on the 1st of November, 2019. ❤

Story Friday Chemistry – we want your stories!

After a lovely long summer and story walks in the sun, Story Fridays is back inside, at Burdall’s Yard in Bath.  Our next event in November has the theme Chemistry. Are you thinking of bunsen burners, or eyes meeting across a crowded room? Whatever you choose, chemistry is all about reactions, explosive or otherwise. We can’t wait to see where our latest theme takes you!

Story Friday Chemistry will be on 8th November, deadline for submissions is 28th October. We’re looking for stories that are 2,000 words or fewer.  (Full submission details are here).  Writers must be available to come to Bath for the event.  If you’d rather not read, we have wonderful actors who can read your story for you.

For more information about Story Friday, to listen to stories that we have recorded at our events over the years, and/or to submit your story please visit A Word In Your Ear.