Issue 7 available + call for submissions

Issue 7 of The Nottingham Review is now available to read online here.

Featuring original short fiction by Chloe Turner, Fiona J. Mackintosh, Anton Rose, Charles Haddox, Shannon McLeod, Rachel Wild, Kimberly Paulk, Jenny Bhatt, Neil Bristow, Mike Fox, Sonia Hope, and Bryn Agnew. Poetry by Adam Tavel, Ariel Clark-Semyck, Matthew Lippman, Sarah Escue, Jacq Greyja, and Benjamin Hertwig.

Call for submissions

We are open for submissions until the end of May. In our first themed issue we are exploring COURAGE. Controlling fear in dangerous or difficult situations. Having the confidence to be yourself. Doing or saying what you think is right despite opposition. Facing suffering with dignity or faith. Courage can be physical or moral, and come in many sizes and shapes. Fiction between 100-3000 words and poetry.

Submission guidelines can be found here.

V.S. Pritchett Memorial Prize 2017 – open for entries

The Royal Society of Literature’s V.S. Pritchett Memorial Prize for unpublished short stories is currently accepting entries. There is a prize of £1,000, and the winning entry will be published in Prospect Magazine online and in the RSL Review. In addition to this, there will be an opportunity for the winner to appear at an RSL event with established short story writers in autumn 2017. Entrants must be resident in the UK and likely to be available for the prize-giving event in autumn 2017. Stories entered for the competition must not have been published previously, or broadcast in any other medium. Stories should be 2,000 and 4,000 words in length. Submission fee is £5 per story.

This year’s judges include Chibundu Onuzo and Michèle Roberts.

More information and entry details can be found on the RSL’s submittable site: https://theroyalsocietyofliterature.submittable.com/submit.

The closing date for entries is 14 June 2017.

JUST OUT! Final Results – Ouen Press Short Story Competition 2016

The very best 2016 competition entries have been published in one anthology entitled Journey through Uncertainty & other short stories features physical and emotional journeys, endured and enjoyed, with humour and courage – each one a testimony to a place, or an event, or a sentiment.

A collection of thought provoking and inspirational travel tales.

Contributors were encouraged to relay through their writing how they might have been changed by a ‘journey’ or how their travels allowed them time to reflect and reinforce, or challenge, accepted viewpoints.

Congratulations to the prizewinners and many thanks to all who entered the competition – visit www.ouenpress.com to view the FINAL RESULTS.

Eire based business writer and housewife, Emma Smith won top place for her work Journey through Uncertainty. Other prizewinners include former UK government advisor and diplomat John Frew, for Danny on the Beach, and London based actor, writer & adventurer Sophia Jackson-Gill for The Land of the Free.

We were delighted again with the global reach of the competition as we promoted a worldwide submissions policy, reflecting our interest in talented writers regardless of geography.

And what’s more, the show of interest in the competition from both experienced writers and those new to the short story form has encouraged us here at Ouen Press to continue with the annual competition. Deadline dates and details of the upcoming theme will be made available on our website later in the year – or you may wish to check in with us on Twitter @OuenP or Facebook @ouenpress for more regular updates on future competitions and all our other activities.

Wishing you every success with your future writing projects, all the best from the Ouen Press team.

Writing better, and Dorset Fiction Award.

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Entering writing contests is possibly one of the best things you can do to improve yourself as a writer. You are given a challenge – it’s a motivation, a framework. You write for longer to meet a deadline, and edit better to meet a word limit. After that, once you submit your piece, you learn about the hope and anticipation of having your work judged. Then after a wait, when the winners are announced, you might be disappointed, or you might be ecstatic. Either way, you’ll always come out of it a better writer.

This is an ethos we believe at our competition, The Dorset Fiction Award. We’re running a short story contest, rolling twice a year. It’s open to anyone from anywhere, closing on the 10th of June. We’re looking for fewer than one thousands words of fiction in any genre/topic. The first prize is our unconditional love and admiration… as well as £500. You’ll also get published in our yearly anthology.

Also, on a lighter note, do you like otters? They’re the cute furry things that can swim. Because on this turn, we are supporting the International Otter Survival Fund (IOSF). A brilliant charity dedicated to the protection and conservation of otters. The winner of this competition will also get to choose the charity of the next turn.

For all the details, check out our website http://www.dorsetfictionaward.co.uk/

Also connect with us @DorsetFiction

And to all the writers out there – keep on at it, and we hope to read you soon!

2017 Bristol Short Story Prize

The entry deadline to the 2017 Bristol Short Story Prize  is just two weeks away. We’d like to take the opportunity to remind writers that we welcome stories of all kinds from all writers throughout the world.

We’ve published a huge range of stories in our first 9 anthologies – stories set throughout history from ancient Greece to the present day, and beyond to imagined futures. Stories set on all continents by writers from numerous countries. There have been stories narrated by octogenarians, by children not yet a decade old, and others with narrators and protagonists at all stages of life in between. Stories written in the first, second and third persons, with the broadest sweep of styles and genres from the familiar to the obscure: historical, romance, literary, science fiction, harsh realism, surreal flights of fancy, tense thrillers, comic capers, ‘experimental’ tales, sparsely written hammer blows of what some might call flash fiction and lots more. There have been high, mid and low brow stories; stories written as blog posts, album reviews, in verse, as diaries, as a series of emails, as well as a sumptuous crop of the more traditional; stories of 4,000 words and those with just a few hundred, one of which won first prize in 2010.

We invite you to show us what’s possible in a short story, what a short story can be, what a story can do and what ‘short story’ means to you. Drop our jaws, make us weep, make us rethink, tickle us, entertain us, confound us, provoke us, comfort us, stimulate us, storify us to another time or place but above all we want to encourage and inspire you to feel free to write what you want in whatever form you want.

Here are some details of this year’s competition:

The 2017 Bristol Short Story Prize is open to all published and unpublished writers over 16 years of age. Stories can be on any theme or subject and entry can be made online via the website or by post. Entries must be previously unpublished with a maximum length of 4,000 words (There is no minimum). The entry fee is £8 per story.
The closing date for entries is midnight (BST) May 3rd 2017.

20 stories will be shortlisted and published in Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology Volume 10.
The winner and 2 runners up will be selected from the shortlist and announced at an awards ceremony
which will be held in Bristol Central Library on October 14th 2017.

1st prize is £1,000, 2nd prize is £700, 3rd prize is £400. 17 further prizes of £100 will be presented
to the remaining shortlisted writers. All shortlisted writers will receive 2 free copies of the anthology.
Prizes will be sent to any writer on the shortlist who is unable to attend the awards ceremony.

And our amazing judging panel will be chaired by writer, Tania Hershman. Tania will be joined on the panel by the writer, Roshi Fernando; Simon Key, owner of the award-winning Big Green Bookshop, and Juliet Pickering, literary agent at Blake Friedmann.

For full details and rules on the 2017 Bristol Short Story Prize please click here.

And best of luck to all of you who enter!

 

 

April Round-Up

Lit Mags & Anthologies

The A3 Review tells us about its new things: An issue, A Contest and A3 on Instagram. Bunbury is back with Issue 15 and some exciting news. Fictive Dream is open to submissions of short stories and flash fiction. DNA magazine asks if writing for DNA magazine is on your list of things to do. to be published in 2018.

Competitions

The Casket of Fictional Delights is running a flash fiction competition, deadline 31 May.  The 2017 Crediton Short Story Competition is now accepting entries, deadline 20 April, and you have until April 26th to enter the Shooter short story competition. The Reflex summer flash fiction competition is now open, deadline May 31.

Live Lit & Book Tours

Arachne Press presents Liam Hogan on a book tour for his new short story collection, Happy Ending NOT Guaranteed. While Talking Tales’ submissions are now closed,they’d like to invite you to their next event on April 22nd in Bristol.  Hand of Doom iscalling for submissions from Kent writers for its May event.  Stroud Short Stories isopen to submissions, deadline April 22nd, for their 21st May event in Stroud.  Here are the April dates for the Smut Slam UK tour. The UK’s first Flash Fiction Festival is being held in Bath on June 24th and 25th.

Workshops & Courses

 

Bunbury is back with Issue 15 and some exciting news!

Well, hello from all of us at Bunbury Magazine to you, Dear Bunburyists,

We’re not quite sure on the etiquette for how late we can wish you all a Happy New Year. We think after about 15th January it becomes a little awkward but, you know what? This is the first issue of 2017 so you’re getting it…

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

We hope your 2017 has gotten off to a rollicking start. Ours has been a nice peaceful affair here so far. That’s what we’re going with anyway. In reality, we have been running around like blue-proverbialled flies getting this next nugget of loveliness together for you! We make it sound like a chore, don’t we? It really is not!

Once again, we have been blessed with some of the finest writing from around the world. It has been an honour to read all the words sent in to us. Not only that, but we have some wonderful art to bring to you (the front cover is more than a little spiffy, we’re sure you’ll agree!)

Without further ado, you can download this new issue for the (not so) new year by clicking on the gorgeous link picture below, kindly given to us by Vincent Davis.

As always, we recommend a £3 donation, which is really good value for all the joy we are bringing to your Kindles/Laptops/Eyes. However, if you would like to donate £15 to our support network for grass-roots creativity, we will send you a copy of The Bunbury Creative Anthology. Simply email us on bunburymagazine@gmail.com with your details when you have paid and we will put it in the post for you.

As well as all this, last year we had the pleasure of putting together two incredible features for you. As usual, we took our annual trip up to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. As usual, we spent five days legging it from one venue to the next, making sure we caught up with the very best shows at the Fringe and boy, did we see some utter crackers! This issue’s feature brings you the very best of The Fringe 2016.

As well as this, we are thrilled to bring you a feature on Evidently, one of Manchester’s premier spoken word nights. Honestly, if you love performance poetry, get down to this bad boy. We don’t care that you don’t live in the area. Travel! We interviewed the headliners and open mic guests to give you a flavour of what Kieren King and Ella Gainsborough, the eminent creators of Evidently, organise.

  Last but not least, the exciting news! We’ve been short-listed for Best Magazine in this year’s Saboteur Awards. Thank you so much to all those who voted for us to get to the short-list. Last year, we came third. This year, we want to win. We want to win for all the writers, artists, comedians, performers and all round magnificent people we have featured in all 15 issues. To vote for us, click on the picture below. (While you’re there, please vote for Evidently, stars of this issue, for Best Regular Spoken Word Show!) We’d really appreciate it.

            Anyway, happy new year again. Yeah, yeah, we know it’s too late for all that. Just go and read the magazine, will you?

Much love and keep scribbling,

Christopher and Keri.