The Manchester Review Issue 13 & Call for Submissions!

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Dear ShortStops readers,

we want to thank you all for your contributions and support in the run-up to the most recent issue of The Manchester Review, which launched on Monday 8th December. The submissions queue truly impressed us and we think Issue 13 is one of our finest volumes to date, featuring fiction from David Gaffney, Chris KillenJim Quinn, Emily-Jo Hopson, Rob McClure Smith, and the co-winner of the 2013 Commonwealth Short Story Prize, Sharon Millar. That’s all in addition to a fantastic selection of poetry, and artwork by Debbie Goldsmith.

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As we said in the issue’s editorial, there is clearly no shortage of good literary work emerging and being published in the northwest of England and beyond. With that in mind, we will open again to submissions for our Issue 14, slated for next spring, on Monday 15th December – so please do continue to send us your best work!

In the meantime, happy Christmas to you, from all of our editors!

Valerie, Ian, and John.

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The Manchester Review: New issue and Call for Submissions!

Dear readers,

the editorial team here at The Manchester Review are delighted to announce that Issue 12 is now live – featuring poetry from Rebecca Perry, Jan Wagner, Thomas McCarthy, Igor Klikovac and Theodore Worozbyt, Ian Pople, Gerard Fanning and Peter Fallon; non-fiction from Marci Vogel; and – of particular interest to ShortStops readers – new short fiction from Jane Feaver, James Robison, Martin Monohan, Tendai Huchu, Guy Mitchell, Helen Cross and Christos Tsiolkas. As always, each piece is accompanied by artwork from an emerging artist, and this issue we are pleased to feature work from Liverpool-based practitioner, Sumuyya Khader.

We would like to thank each and every one of you who submitted work for the issue – winnowing down the selection is always tough, and we received some truly excellent short stories this time. We are now open to submissions until Sunday October 5th, and we expect to launch Issue 13 in November 2014. We’re greatly looking forward to reading your work, and we will do our very best to reply to each submission within three months.

The Editors

 

Manchester Review, Issue 12: Call for Submissions

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Dear writers,

The Manchester Review is currently reading submissions for Issue 12. We’re seeking previously unpublished high-quality literary fiction with an upper word-limit of 6,000 and no restrictions on theme. Novel extracts are welcome, but they must function as stand-alone pieces. We’ll be reading through until mid-May. Have a look at our archives for inspiration: in the past we’ve featured Kevin Barry, Jennifer Egan and Martin Amis – maybe next time we’ll feature you!

The Editors

(Ian, John and Valerie)

 

 

The Manchester Review: Issue 11 is now live!

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We’re delighted to announce that the latest issue of The Manchester Review is now live. It’s our eleventh outing, and as always, it features a selection of new and exciting short fiction from writers based here in the UK as well as much further afield.  In previous editions, we have had the pleasure of publishing work by Martin Amis, John Banville, Jennifer Egan, Ali Smith, Kevin Barry and Colm Toibin; this winter, we’re proud to welcome Richard Lea, Richard Hirst, Torii Grabowski, Elvis Bego, Kathryn Kruse and Peter Frederick Matthews to our pages, accompanied by stunning artwork from Mary Griffiths. To whet your appetites, here’s a couple of teasers…

This is how it will start. You see him on stage, strumming a blue Stetson, his mouth tightened in concentration. You look at him through your viewfinder and capture him singing along with the chorus. He looks directly into your camera, and you let it hang loose around your neck. You hold his gaze, then look away. It will be a game, and you will win. That is how it will start.

Torii Grabowski

His question is this: Does the violence stop at a certain age? Will he, when he is 17, when he is 25, when he is 36, when he is living his real life and has finally become the person he is meant to be, will he still be eyeing up every other person he comes across, assessing whether or not they are about to attack him? And if so, will he really ever be his true self? Can he imagine living with this constant threat and suspicion and not remain a boy who makes bargains with himself, pretending nothing will happen so that nothing will happen, a person lurking at the fringes of their own life, endlessly compromising, waiting for some phoney future when they can finally take up residence at the centre of things, afraid for it ever to be now?

Peter Frederick Matthews

Intrigued? Click through to read more. We’re currently closed for submissions, but we’ll reopen in the New Year with an announcement about our Spring and Autumn issues for 2014. Stay tuned!

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Valerie O’Riordan, Ian McGuire, John McAuliffe (editors)